EHC Program Inside Track Newsletter

Issue 6, July 2012

EHC Inside Track is a newsletter highlighting important news and developments from AHRQ's Effective Health Care Program.

In this issue:

From Florida to Alaska: Partners Highlighting Effective Health Care Program Resources

More than 250 regional and local organizations—hospitals, businesses, churches, health departments, clinics, patient groups, and others—are now partnering with AHRQ's Effective Health Care Program to promote evidence-based health care decisionmaking.

These organizations are helping ensure that the Effective Health Care Program's plain-language research summaries make it into the hands of patients, clinicians, and policymakers. Some examples from organizations in 48 States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands include—

  • The Cleveland Clinic Department of Family Medicine linked to program materials in its electronic health record system so clinicians can quickly compare treatments when creating patient care plans.
  • The Midwest Business Group on Health included research summaries in its Take Control of Your Health campaign to help companies and their employees identify and manage health issues.
  • West End Medical Centers in Atlanta collaborated with the AHRQ Effective Health Care Program to provide patient resources on diabetes and heart disease—two major health risks for African American women—to more than 2,000 attendees at the Church of God in Christ's 62nd Women's International Convention.

AHRQ's five Regional Partnership Development Offices initiate these and other partnerships.

"These resources are valuable because they help people communicate better with their health care providers," explained Nancie McAnaugh, M.S.W., project director for the Missouri Health Equity Collaborative, another partner in the network. "They provide people with the confidence needed to ask questions and participate in health care decisionmaking."

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EHC Program Adds 10 New Spanish-language Consumer Publications

With the addition of 10 new Spanish publications, AHRQ's Effective Health Care Program now has more than two dozen free, easy-to-read Spanish resources to help consumers compare treatments for conditions ranging from high blood pressure to diabetes to depression.

Some of these publications are highlighted in Aprende a vivir ("Learn to Live"), AHRQ's three-episode Spanish-language videonovela that mimics the popular telenovela format to dramatize the risks taken by some Type 2 diabetes patients who forget to take their medicine or stop because of side effects.

AHRQ's growing set of Spanish resources is designed to help Hispanics—who often experience poor health outcomes compared with whites—navigate a complex health care system. AHRQ's Spanish publications also help doctors, nurses, and other professionals speak to patients about their treatment options and health concerns.

The Effective Health Care Program's newest Spanish-language consumer publications summarize the benefits, risks, and effectiveness of treatments for the following conditions:

 

The new Spanish-language consumer publications can be downloaded from the Effective Health Care Program Web site. The Aprende a vivir videonovela series is on AHRQ's Healthcare 411 Web site.

These and other Spanish-language resources are also available on the Effective Health Care Program's Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/AHRQehc.espanol.

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New Resources Compare ADHD Treatments

New publications are available from AHRQ's Effective Health Care Program to help parents and health care professionals discuss treatment options for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The publications summarize scientific evidence that shows parental behavior training reduces ADHD symptoms and disruptive behavior disorders in children under 6 and discuss long-term treatment effectiveness for all age groups.

The free consumer treatment comparison summary includes the following:

  • An explanation of ADHD and related symptoms
  • A description of the risks and benefits of ADHD non-medicine and medicine treatment options
  • Factors a caregiver should consider before choosing a treatment option
  • Questions for parents to discuss with their health care providers

ADHD is a condition classified by inattention, overactivity, and impulsivity. It affects children of all ages, and approximately 5 percent of children worldwide show symptoms including hyperactivity and difficulty paying attention or focusing on tasks. While ADHD is most commonly identified and treated in elementary school (ages 7 to 9), there is growing interest in identifying children who show signs of ADHD at a very young age in order to treat them as early as possible.

More information for clinicians is in the following free materials:

The new ADHD resources are based on AHRQ's research review Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effectiveness of Treatment in At-Risk Preschoolers; Long-Term Effectiveness in All Ages; and Variability in Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Treatment. These materials and others that explore the benefits and risks of treatment options for many common health conditions are available on the Effective Health Care Program Web site: www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov.

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More New Effective Health Care Program Resources

Antinuclear Antibody, Rheumatoid Factor, and Cyclic-Citrullinated Peptide Tests for Evaluating Musculoskeletal Complaints in Children

Clinician research summary on Antinuclear Antibody, Rheumatoid Factor, and Cyclic-Citrullinated Peptide Tests for Evaluating Musculoskeletal Complaints in Children.These materials summarize the latest research on the use of serological tests to diagnose inflammatory causes of musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents. While evidence does not support the use of these tests for all complaints of MSK pain, research indicates these tests may be useful as a supplement to a physical exam. Available resources include—

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effectiveness of Treatment in At-Risk Preschoolers; Long-Term Effectiveness in All Ages; and Variability in Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Consumer treatment comparison summary on Treatment Options for ADHD in Children and Teens.See the above article for more information. Available resources include—

 

 

Multidisciplinary Postacute Rehabilitation for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Adults

New research review on Multidisciplinary Postacute Rehabilitation for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Adults.For patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is not enough research to determine the effectiveness of multidisciplinary postacute rehabilitation programs (programs which aim to improve a TBI patient's physical, cognitive, and behavioral health) for improving patient health and functioning. Available resources include—

 

 

 

Noninvasive Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease in Women

New research review on Noninvasive Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease in WomenNoninvasive tests that produce images of how well the heart is functioning, such as echocardiography (ECHO) and single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT), more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in women with suspicious symptoms than electrocardiography (ECG), which monitors heartbeats to detect restricted blood flow. Available resources include—

For all Effective Health Care Program resources, visit www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov.

 

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Page last reviewed September 2012
Internet Citation: EHC Program Inside Track Newsletter: Issue 6, July 2012. September 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/insidetrack/2012/6/index.html