Report examines quality improvement measurement in people with disabilities

Research Activities, December 2012, No. 388

A new report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) found that there is little evidence to adequately assess the measures for evaluating quality improvement outcomes among people with disabilities. Quality of life, social functioning, or other outcome measures are critical for assessing the quality of care for people with physical, intellectual, or developmental disabilities. These disabilities can aggravate medical problems and complicate treatment and follow-up care. There are no studies of medical care for basic medical needs or secondary conditions in mixed populations of people with and without disabilities that include disability as an underlying condition.

According to the lead author, Mary Butler, Ph.D., of the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center, research on disability as a coexisting condition is at an early stage and could benefit from organized databases of critically assessed outcome measures.

The report is part of a larger initiative Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science, and builds on an earlier AHRQ series of evidence reports Closing the Quality Gap: A Critical Analysis of Quality Improvement Strategies. The initiative was developed by AHRQ's Effective Health Care Program, which funds effectiveness and comparative effectiveness research and makes findings available for clinicians, consumers, and policymakers.

To read Quality Improvement Measurement of Outcomes for People with Disabilities and other reports, go to http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov.

Current as of December 2012
Internet Citation: Report examines quality improvement measurement in people with disabilities: Research Activities, December 2012, No. 388. December 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/research-activities/12dec/1212RA42.html