USPSTF Vision Screening in Kids

Transcript

Transcript of Audio news release featuring Dr. Ned Calonge about the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force recommendation about vision screening for children.

NARRATOR:
Children under five should be screened for vision problems—including lazy eye, crossed eyes, and near- and far-sightedness—according to a new recommendation issued by the US Preventive Services Task Force. Left untreated, these conditions may interfere with a child's ability to learn—or otherwise affect his or her performance in school. They can also lead to more-serious vision problems.

Doctor Ned Calonge ["kah-lunge"]—Task-Force Chair, and Chief Medical Officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment...

Dr. Calonge:
"Ask your doctor to check your child's vision. The tests are very simple. The earlier the detection, the more likely that treatments will be effective, and will prevent vision-related problems in school for your child."

NARRATOR:
Visual Impairment is a common condition that affects five- to 10-percent of preschool-age children—but often goes undiagnosed. Children found to have one of these conditions should be referred to a specialized eye-care professional for treatment. For more information, talk with your doctor or other health-care provider.

Current as of May 2004
Internet Citation: USPSTF Vision Screening in Kids: Transcript. May 2004. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/audio-video/visioneng.html