Morning Briefing and Shadowing (Slide Presentation)

On the CUSP: Stop BSI

This PowerPoint slide presentation was shown on July 12, 2011.

 

Contents

Slide 1. Improving Situational Awareness by Conducting a Morning Briefing
Slide 2. Situation Awareness: An Overview
Slide 3. Briefing Defined
Slide 4. Effective Briefings
Slide 5. When to Conduct Briefings
Slide 6. Who Participates
Slide 7. Morning Briefing Process
Slide 8. What Happened Overnight That I Need to Know?
Slide 9. Where Should Rounds Begin?
Slide 10. As You Continue Planning Rounds
Slide 11. Do You Anticipate Any Potential Defects During the Day?
Slide 12. When You Identify Defects or Problems
Slide 13. Status of Safety Issues - CUSP
Slide 14. On the CUSP: Shadowing Another Provider
Slide 15.Why Do We Need to Shadow?
Slide 16. Who Should Have This Experience?
Slide 17. How To
Slide 18. Review This Tool
Slide 19. Section 1
Slide 20. Section 2
Slide 21. Section 3-5
Slide 22. If You Were Following a Nurse
Slide 23. If You Were Following a Physician
Slide 24. How Would You Assess
Slide 25. Recommendations and Actions
Slide 26. Our Findings
Slide 27. Our Findings
Slide 28. Our Findings
Slide 29. Our Findings
Slide 30. Discussion

 

Slide 1. Improving Situational Awareness by Conducting a Morning Briefing

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Slide 2. Situation Awareness--An Overview

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  • Members of the team have an understanding of what’s going on and what is likely to happen next
  • Teams are alert to developing situations, sensitive to cues, and aware of their implications

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Slide 3. Briefing Denied

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A discussion between two or more people, often a team, using succinct information pertinent to an event.

A briefing immediately --

  1. Maps out the plan of care
  2. Identifies roles and responsibilities for each team member .
  3. Heightens awareness of the situation 
  4. Allows the team to plan for the unexpected 
  5. Allows team members’ needs and expectations to be met

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Slide 4. Effective Briefings

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Set the tone for the day -- Chaotic versus organized and efficient

Encourage participation and ownership by all team members

  • Organizes thoughts regarding the procedure 
  • Establishes competence
    • Who has what skills 
    • Who performs what 
    • Who knows what 
  • Predicts what will happen later 
  • Plans for the unexpected, including equipment, medications, consults

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Slide 5. When to Conduct Briefings

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  • Beginning of the day – Morning briefing 
  • Prior to any procedure in any setting 
  • Situational – Change in patient status results in deviation from plan of care 
  • Reporting off breaks 
  • Shift change

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Slide 6. Who Participates

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  • Physician doing rounds who is responsible for the ICU patients that day 
  • Night charge nurse
  • Day charge nurse

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Slide 7. Morning Briefing Process

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Three simple questions

  1. What happened overnight that I need to know about? 
  2. Where should I begin rounds? 
  3. Do you anticipate any potential defects in the day?

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Slide 8. What Happened Overnight That I Need to Know About?

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You should ask --

  • Was there adequate coverage? 
  • Were there any equipment issues? 
  • Were new cases posted to the ICU? 
  • Were there unexpected changes in patient acuity? 
  • Were there any adverse events?

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Slide 9. Where Should Rounds Begin?

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You should ask --

  • Is there a patient who requires my immediate attention secondary to acuity? 
  • Which patients do you believe will be transferring out of the unit today? 
  • Who has discharge orders written?

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Slide 10. As You Continue Planning Rounds

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You should ask --

  • How many admissions are planned today?
  • What time is the first admission?
  • How many open beds do we have?
  • Are there any patients having problems on an inpatient unit?

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Slide 11. Do You Anticipate Any Potential Defects in the Day?

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  • Patient scheduling
  • Equipment availability or problems
  • Outside patient testing or road trips
  • Physician or nurse staffing
  • Provider skill mix

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Slide 12. When You Identify Defects or Problems

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  • Assign a person to the issue and have them follow up 
  • Identify actions taken to meet any patient or unit needs
  • Report back to the staff what those actions were or will be
  • Continue to report it during morning briefing until it is resolved or use Status of Safety Issues

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Slide 13. Status of Safety Issues - CUSP

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Image of a blank form for new and completed safety issues.

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Slide 14. On the CUSP: Shadowing Another Provider

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Slide 15. Why Do We Need to Shadow?

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  • To gain perspective of the other providers
    • Practice 
    • Responsibilities 
    • Work environment
  • To identify issues that affect teamwork and communication that may affect patient care, patient care delivery, and patient outcomes

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Slide 16. Who Should Have This Experience?

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  • Patient care areas as part of CUSP
  • Staff involved in the delivery of patient care in units where culture score indicate a poor score in teamwork and safety
  • When there is a difference of >20 percent in culture scores between provider types
  • As part of orientation to a new unit
  • Units with little collaboration between disciplines

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Slide 17. How To

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  • Review the shadowing tool prior to your shadowing experience
  • Follow your health care provider through his or her daily activities.
  • Review your list of communication and teamwork problems
  • Discuss with the provider
  • Make a plan for resolution

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Slide 18. Review the Tool

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  • Set up with questions and prompts for the personnel using it
  • Make changes that are specific to your unit

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Slide 19. Section 1

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Were any health care providers difficult to approach? 

  • How did that impact the health care provider you followed? (obtained an order, ignored, etc.)
  • What was the final outcome for the patient? (delay in care, etc.)

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Slide 20. Section 2

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Did one provider get approached more often for patient issues?

  • Was it because another health care provider was difficult to work with?

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Slide 21. Sections 3-5

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Did you observe an error in transcription of orders by the provider you followed? 

Did you observe an error in the interpretation or delivery of an order? 

Were patient problems identified quickly?

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Slide 22. If You Were Following a Nurse

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Did you observe that in a crisis or when there was an important issue, a nurse’s page or phone call was not returned quickly?

What was the outcome for this patient?

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Slide 23. If You Were Following a Physician

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What were the obstacles that a physician faced in returning calls or pages? 

What other factors impacted his or her ability to see patients?

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Slide 24. How Would You Assess

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  • Handoffs
  • Communication during a crisis
  • Provider skill
  • Staffing

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Slide 25. Recommendations and Actions

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  • What will you do differently in your clinical practice? 
  • What would you recommend to improve teamwork and communication
Specific RecommendationActions Taken
  
  
  

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Slide 26. Our Findings

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  • Handoffs for 4-hour shifts not thorough, increased opportunity to forget key details as this increased the total number of people
  • Physician consults usually obtained but not always read by the requesting team
  • Nurse often most informed but does not always speak up

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Slide 27. Our Findings

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  • Nurse is the provider most often left with patient information to pass on to another provider; few conversations from MD to MD
  • Pharmacists did not realize how critical supplying Pyxis and stock drugs were
  • Some providers avoided
  • EMR was not accessed

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Slide 28. Our Findings

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  • Nurses did not realize how complicated sterile processing was; efforts made to keep trays together
  • POE removed an important step; communicating to RN of stat order
  • Physicians unaware of unit policies, depend on RNs to complete task

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Slide 29. Our Findings

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  • Some nursing practices, such as labeling, should be used hospital wide
  • Isolation policies not adhered to -- Primarily physician personnel, consults; required RNs to speak up
  • Assertiveness training indicated

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Slide 30. Discussion

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Questions?

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Current as of October 2011
Internet Citation: Morning Briefing and Shadowing (Slide Presentation): On the CUSP: Stop BSI. October 2011. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/education/curriculum-tools/cusptoolkit/contentcalls/briefing-slides/briefingslides.html