Patient Family Engagement Power Point Content and Alternate Text

CUSP Toolkit

The Patient and Family Engagement module of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) Toolkit. The CUSP toolkit is a modular approach to patient safety, and modules presented in this toolkit are interconnected and are aimed at improving patient safety.
Slide Number and TitleSlide ContentContent for Alternative Text (Illustration)
Slide 1
Cover Slide
(CUSP Toolkit logo)The “Patient and Family Engagement” module of the CUSP Toolkit. The CUSP toolkit is a modular approach to patient safety, and modules presented in this toolkit are interconnected and are aimed at improving patient safety.
Slide 2
Learning Objectives
  1. Explore the role of patient and family as advisors
  2. Describe how to work with patient advisors
  3. Present tools to improve communication among patients, families, and clinicians
  4. Discuss how to communicate an adverse event to patients and family members
  1. Explore the role of patient and family as advisors
  2. Describe how to work with patient advisors
  3. Present tools to improve communication among patients, families, and clinicians
  4. Discuss how to communicate an adverse event to patients and family members
Slide 3
The Patient’s Hospital Experience1

Clinicians and Hospital Staff

  • Know how the hospital works and how to achieve results
  • Know who hospital staff are and what they do
  • Are busy and under a lot of stress

Patients

  • Are strangers in this environment
  • Don’t know who different staff are and what they do
  • Are often in pain or uncomfortable, vulnerable or afraidAre aware that hospital staff are busy and may not want to bother them

Clinicians and Hospital Staff

  • Know how the hospital works and how to achieve results
  • Know who hospital staff are and what they do
  • Are busy and under a lot of stress

Patients

  • Are strangers in this environment
  • Don’t know who different staff are and what they do
  • Are often in pain or uncomfortable, vulnerable or afraid
  • Are aware that hospital staff are busy and may not want to bother them
Slide 4
Patient- and Family-Centered Care3
Patient- and Family-Centered Care3
  • Involves “...collaborating with patients and families of all ages, at all levels of care, and in all health care settings... acknowledges that families, however they are defined, are essential to patients’ health and well-being…”

Core concepts of patient- and family-centered care are:

  • Dignity and respect
  • Information sharing
  • Participation
  • Collaboration
Alt text: A family member and providers surrounding a patient in a hospital bed
Slide 5
What is Patient Family Engagement?2
  • Patient and family engagement:
  • Is an important component of patient- and family-centered care
  • Creates an environment where patients, families, clinicians, and hospital staff all work together as partners to improve the quality and safety of hospital care
  • Involves patients and family members as:
  • Members of the health care team
  • Advisors working with clinicians and leaders to improve policies and procedures
 
Slide 6
Who are Advisors and What do they do?
  • Advisors are collaborative partners in developing and revising hospital policies, procedures, and practices
  • Patients and family members who have received care at our hospital and who want to help improve experiences for others
  • They help our hospital improve quality and safety of care by:
  • Giving input and feedback
  • Identifying potential changes and feedback
  • Planning and implementing changes that matter to patients and families
  • Collaborative partner in developing and revising hospital policies, procedures, and practices
  • Provide views on:
    • Patient and family experiences
    • How to deliver care to patients
    • Materials developed for patients and families
    • Facility design
A provider and a patient walking together
Slide 7
Characteristics of an Engaged Advisor1
  • Listen well
  • Share your views
  • Draw on your communication skills
  • Ask questions
  • Be ready for disagreements
 
Slide 8
Characteristics of an Engaged Advisor

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Characteristics of an Engaged Advisor
Slide 9
How to Work with Patient Advisors1
  • Invite two or three patients and family members to a team meeting to discuss their hospital stay
  • Ask patients and families to give feedback on educational or informational materials
  • Invite patients and families to present at staff orientations and in-service programs
  • Explore the hospital and unit through the eyes of patients and their families by
    conducting a “walk-about” with patients and families
A health care team, including a patient and family member, gathered around a conference table
Slide 10
How to Engage Patients and Families1
  • When you enter the room:
    • Read chart before stepping in
    • Make eye contact with the patient
    • Introduce yourself by name and role
    • Introduce new people in room by name, role, and what they will do
  • When you first assess the patient:
    • Ask how the patient prefers to be addressed
    • Identify family who should be partners in the patient’s care
    • Highlight main points of communication tools
    • Invite the patient and family to use the white board to “talk” with clinicians
 
Slide 11
How to Engage Patients and Families1 (continued)
  • Ask about and listen to the patient and family’s needs and concerns:
    • Use open-ended questions
    • Listen to, respect, and act on what the patient and family say
    • Help patients articulate their concerns when needed
    • Get a translator’s assistance if the patient or family member cannot understand you
  • Help the patient and family understand the diagnosis, condition, and next steps:
  • Give timely and complete information — take every opportunity to educate the patient and family
  • Use plain language
  • Invite the patient or family to take notes
 
Slide 12
Effective Patient and Family Communication

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Effective Patient and Family Communication
Slide 13
The Importance of Effective Communication
 Two providers standing together and conversing
Slide 14
The Link Between Communication and Patient Safety1
  • Patient outcomes
  • Patient safety
  • Perceptions of quality
A health care team made up of clinicians and leaders
Slide 15
Communication Tips1
  • Speak slowly
  • Use plain language
  • Reassure patient and family by giving information
  • Thank patient or family for calling attention to any issue raised
  • Invite them to continue asking questions
A patient surrounded by a health care team
Slide 16
IDEAL Discharge Example
 A patient surrounded by a health care team
Slide 17
What is IDEAL Discharge Planning?1
  • Include the patient and family as full partners
  • Discuss with the patient and family the five key areas to prevent problems at home
  • Educate the patient and family throughout the hospital stay
  • Assess how well doctors and nurses explain the diagnosis, condition, and next steps in their care — use teach-back
  • Listen to and honor the patient and family’s goals, preferences, observations, and concerns
 
Slide 18
Benefits of IDEAL Discharge Planning for Clinicians1
  • Improves accuracy of information about the patient’s condition and discharge situation
  • Reduces risk and liability
  • Enhances quality of care for patient
  • Demonstrates that hospital staff consider patient perspective important
  • Shows teamwork among hospital staff
  • Patient and family have a better experience of care
  • Ensures that patients and families know how and what to do and will be less anxious once discharged
  • Prevents postdischarge complications and avoidable readmissions
 
Slide 19
IDEAL Discharge

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IDEAL Discharge

Slide 20
What if an Adverse Event Occurs on the Unit?
  
Slide 21
Engagement Strategies
  • Engaging in planning and design — Infrastructure advisory
  • Engaging in everyday care — How-to strategies
  • Engaging after an adverse event
 
Slide 22
Introduction to Adverse Events
  • Adverse event: An injury to a patient caused by medical intervention rather than by the underlying disease or condition of the patient
  • The mission of health care providers is to help and care for patients without harming them, but adverse events happen
  • When an adverse even occurs, it can be difficult for a health care worker to take ownership and communicate with the patient and family
  • Prompt, compassionate, and honest communication with the patient and family after an adverse event is essential
 
Slide 23
Immediate Response to an Adverse Event3
  • Care for the patient
  • Report to the appropriate parties
  • Communicate with the patient (who, what, when, where, and why)
  • Document the event in the medical record
 
Slide 24
Next Steps in Responding to an Adverse Event5
  • Investigation
  • Continued communication with the patient and family
  • Apology and remediation
  • System and process improvement
  • Measurement and evaluation
  • Education and training

 

 
Slide 25
How to Communicate About an Adverse Event6
  • Speak slowly and use clear language
  • Give an advance alert (“I’m afraid I have some news to share with you.”)
  • Give the news in a few, brief sentences
  • Quietly wait for the reaction
  • Watch and listen for response signals

 

 
Slide 26
The Second Victim: Health Care Workers7
  • Health care workers involved in an adverse event experience their own trauma
  • Health care workers should request ongoing support from peers
  • Hospitals have developed Employee Assistance Programs and Medically Induced Trauma Support Services
 
Slide 27
Summary
  • Advisors provide valuable insight about patient and family experiences and care delivery
  • Effective engagement and communication among patients, family members and other members of the health care team impacts health outcomes and patient and family satisfaction
  •  IDEAL Discharge Planning is an effective tool for ensuring patient and family member engagement and education
  • Organizations should be prepared to respond and communicate proactively when adverse events occur
 
Slide 28
Tools
  • Am I Ready To Become an Advisor?1
  • Working with Advisors1
  • Be a Partner in Your Care1
  • Get to Know Your Health Care Team1
  • Care Transitions from Hospital to Home: IDEAL Discharge Planning1
  • SBAR (Situation — Background — Assessment — Recommendation)2
 
Slide 29
References
  1. Guide to Patient and Family Engagement in Hospital Quality and Safety. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; May 2013. AHRQ Publication No. 13-0033.
  2. TeamSTEPPS Instructor Guide. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; June 2006. AHRQ Publication No. 06-0020. 
  3. Conway J, Johnson B, Edgman-Levitan S, et.al. Partnering with Patients and Families to Design a Patient- and Family-Centered Health Care System: A Roadmap for the Future. A work in progress. Bethesda, MD: Institute for Family-Centered Care; June 2006.
 
Slide 30
References
  1. Bonacum D, Houk C, Moidel BI, et al. Communicating about episodes of harm to patients. In: Leonard M, ed. Achieving Safe and Reliable Healthcare. Chicago: Health Administration Press; 2004:93-112.
  2. McDonald T, Helmche L, Smith K, et al. Responding to patient safety incidents: the ‘seven pillars.’ Qual Saf Health Care 2010;19:e11. 
  3. Hallenback JL. Palliative Care Perspectives. 1st ed. New York: Oxford University Press; 2003.
  4. Wu AW. Medical error: the second victim. The doctor who makes the mistake needs help, too. BMJ. 2000 Mar 18;320(7237):726-727.
 
Page last reviewed September 2013
Internet Citation: Patient Family Engagement Power Point Content and Alternate Text: CUSP Toolkit. September 2013. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/education/curriculum-tools/cusptoolkit/modules/patfamilyengagement/patfamaltexttab.html