TeamSTEPPS® Instructor Manual: Specialty Scenarios

Specialty scenario for this guide.

Contents

Scenario 36
Scenario 37
Scenario 38
Scenario 39
Scenario 40
Scenario 41
Scenario 42
Scenario 43


Scenario 36

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

Upon checking in for her 1030 appointment, Ms. Smith informs the assistant of an allergic reaction to latex gloves. The assistant reassures her that latex gloves are not used in the clinic and proceeds to prepare for the exam. Treatment is started with a rubber dam in place. Ms. Smith signals her discomfort, and the procedure is stopped when she complains that her lips are "swelling." She is taken to the Medical Clinic, where she is treated for her reaction and released.

Instructor Comments

  • A call-out is a tactic used to communicate critical information or an emerging event. In this scenario, the dental assistant fails to advocate for the patient by performing a call-out of information critical to the dentist. This communication failure results in an adverse event. The allergy should have been documented on the chart and communicated to the provider as a call-out of critical information. Situation monitoring and subsequent communication resulted in the correct decision to terminate the procedure and seek necessary care.

Skills Needed

  • Communication. Situation monitoring.

Potential Tools

  • Call-out.
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Scenario 37

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Clinic

 

A 12-weeks' pregnant patient is given a prescription for Doxycycline for Malaria prophylaxis. If given to a pregnant woman, this medication can have adverse effects on the fetus. The pharmacist notifies the clinician who chooses and prescribes a different medication. The substitute medication is dispensed to the patient.

Instructor Comments

  • In effective communication during a check-back, the receiver accepts the message and provides feedback or confirmation. The sender verifies. In this scenario, the pharmacist (receiver) uses situation monitoring to recognize a problem and provides Feedback to the clinician (sender). This act of checking back brings to light the fact that this drug is an incorrect choice for a pregnant woman, the unfolding error is caught, and the correct action is taken. The action in this scenario is a check-back, but it serves as the first step in the Two-Challenge rule. If the clinician had not recognized the error, the pharmacist would elevate the challenge to the second and final steps.

Skills Needed

  • Communication. Mutual support. Situation monitoring.

Potential Tools

  • Check-back, Collaboration, Cross-monitoring.
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Scenario 38

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

The patient is in-processed, and bitewing x rays are taken despite the fact that her health history has not been reviewed. The hygienist reviews the chart and discovers an abscess on #19. Later, evaluative feedback is provided to the dental assistant.

Instructor Comments

  • Feedback is the process of providing information to a team member regarding his or her performance, usually with suggestions on how to improve future performance. In this scenario, evaluative feedback compares an individual's behavior with the standards or accepted practice.

Skills Needed

  • Mutual support.

Potential Tools

  • Feedback, Conflict resolution.
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Scenario 39

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

A wheelchair-bound patient with a known history of being unstable and confused is left alone at the desk to await treatment. The patient tries to get out of his wheelchair and falls forward, striking his head on the counter, which requires followup care.

Instructor Comments

  • A handoff is a tactic used to transfer responsibility and accountability during individual staff or team transitions. In this scenario, either of two actions should have occurred. First, when there is no caregiver available to accept a handoff, the attending caregiver must remain with the patient until someone is available. When a caregiver becomes available, a handoff can occur, and staff can be alerted to any safety issue(s). In view of the safety issue in this case, the patient should go directly into treatment or be placed in a safe setting with an attendee. The principle is you must always formally handoff the care of a patient to another responsible professional, or you must remain responsible for the patient until someone is available. The nurse receiving the patient must acknowledge and accept responsibility. You must always advocate for the safety of the patient.

Skills Needed

  • Communication. Mutual support.

Potential Tools

  • Handoff, Advocacy/assertion.
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Scenario 40

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

The dentist on duty is called in to treat severe postop bleeding from a third molar extraction site. The materials and instruments needed to treat the patient could not be found in the room. The BP machine is not taking accurate readings because the battery is not adequately charged. For about an hour, rapid blood loss continues, and the patient has to be transported. The bleeding is stopped after the socket is packed.

Instructor Comments

  • The term "resource" refers to the people, materials, and time that can be drawn upon to accomplish a task. The goal of resource management is to prevent work overload or situations that compromise patient care and/or lead to error. In this scenario, the treatment room had not been restocked. This may be due to conditions of high or low workload. In the event of high workload, team members are expected to prioritize and assist teammates to ensure that an emergency response room, such as the dental room, is stocked and ready for use. Under conditions of low workload, staff members are expected to use their time constructively to ensure that all emergency equipment or areas of care are restocked and ready to go. Teams hold individuals accountable to these standards, and ultimately, it is the role of leaders to assign and hold teams accountable for the proper allocation and use of resources.

Skills Needed

  • Team structure. Mutual support.

Potential Tools

  • Prioritization, Task assistance, Collaboration, Shared Mental Model.
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Scenario 41

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

In performing an extraction, tooth #14 instead of #16 is removed. The dentist and assistant had been discussing both teeth before the procedure.

Instructor Comments

  • This outcome is always avoidable. In this scenario, if caregivers had individually assessed the status of the patient and the planned extraction, they would have possessed individual situation awareness. Had a brief or check-back occurred, they would have shared their individual situation awareness with the patient (as appropriate) and developed a shared mental model for the planned extraction.

Skills Needed

  • Team structure. Shared mental model. Situation awareness. Situation monitoring.

Potential Tools

  • Brief, Check-back, Advocacy/assertion.
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Scenario 42

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

A dental assistant is attempting to take a bitewing x ray on a 9-year-old with mild autism. Inadvertently, the child aspirates the x ray film and immediately exhibits signs of a partially obstructed airway. Thinking quickly, the dental assistant remembers his recent Basic Life Support training and performs a finger sweep. The child vomits and expels the film.

Instructor Comments

  • A situational leader is any team member who has the skills to manage the situation at hand. In this scenario, the assistant used situation monitoring to recognize a serious situation and performed the quick actions of situational leaders to avoid patient harm.

Skills Needed

  • Situation monitoring.

Potential Tools

  • Advocacy/assertion.
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Scenario 43

Appropriate for: All Specialties
Setting: Dental Clinic

 

A dental assistant notices that there were two dental records open in the operatory—record X and Y. When the dentist and dental assistant are asked which patient they are working on, both assume X, but Y is seated.

Instructor Comments

  • The first and most basic step in the STEP technique was omitted—identifying the patient and assessing his or her status. Additionally, the third step was omitted—assessing the environment to reveal the presence of two open charts. If even one team member used the appropriate skills, the problem would have been recognized and an error prevented.

Skills Needed

  • Situation monitoring. Situation awareness. Mutual support.

Potential Tools

  • Advocacy/assertion.

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Current as of March 2014
Internet Citation: TeamSTEPPS® Instructor Manual: Specialty Scenarios. March 2014. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/education/curriculum-tools/teamstepps/instructor/scenarios/dental.html