Slide 25

Project RED: Module 2: The Re-Designed Discharge Process: Patient Admission and Care and Treatment Education: Slide 25

Provides a four-module training program to help hospitals implement Project RED.

Multidisciplinary Team

  • Consider daily discharge rounds
    • Medical staff, nursing staff, pharmacy, case management, and DA
    • Who will be supportive?
    • Where might resistance come from?
  • When is discharge order written?
    • Was it expected?
    • Weekend discharge?
    • Is there a timing expectation (e.g., time from order to out the door)?

Notes:

Consider your current approach to discharge planning.

  • Are rounds conducted? Maybe there are no discharge rounds, but discharge planning is addressed in daily patient rounds.
  • How well do rounds address discharge planning?
  • What makes rounds work well that you'll want to retain?
  • What gets in the way of more effective discharge planning during rounds?
  • Can you change these barriers?

Consider also what happens once the discharge order is actually written

  • How often is the patient discharge unexpected? If often, it can be a sign that discharge planning is not well done.
  • How are weekend discharges handled? If expected, the DA may conduct final teaching and provide the Patient Care Plan on Friday.

Many hospitals have a discharge disposition goal by time of day (e.g., noon). Some expect that the patient has left the bed within a certain number of minutes after the discharge order is written.

  • How does this goal fit into the new, re-engineered process?
Page last reviewed August 2011
Internet Citation: Slide 25: Project RED: Module 2: The Re-Designed Discharge Process: Patient Admission and Care and Treatment Education: Slide 25. August 2011. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/systems/hospital/red/module2/slide25.html