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Table 1. Physician Specialty and Glycemic Control: Summary Findings

Improving Care for Diabetes Patients Through Intensive Therapy and a Team Approach

StudySubjectsPhysician specialtyGlycemic levels
Hayward RA, Manning WG, Kaplan SH, et al. Starting insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. JAMA 1997; 278(20):1663-9.8,868 type 2 diabeticsGeneralist physicians

2 years after initiation of insulin:

  • Over 60 percent of patients were >8 percent.
Bernard AM, Anderson L, Cook CB, et al. What do internal medicine residents need to enhance their diabetes care? Diabetes Care 1999; 22(5):661-6.140 diabetics (31 type 1, 109 type 2)Internal medicine residents

After 12 months:

  • 50 percent of patients were >8 percent.
Greenfield S, Rogers W, Mangotich M, et al. Outcomes of patients with hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus treated by different systems and specialties. Results from the Medical Outcomes Study. JAMA 1995; 274(18):1436-44170 type 2 diabetics

After 2 years, all patients averaged:

  • General internists: 9.7 percent.
  • Family physicians: 9.3 percent.
  • Endocrinologists: 9.3 percent.

Note: According to the American Diabetes Association, an HbA1c value of 4-6 percent is considered normal. This value is an approximation and may vary depending upon expert opinion.

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Current as of November 2001
Internet Citation: Table 1. Physician Specialty and Glycemic Control: Summary Findings: Improving Care for Diabetes Patients Through Intensive Therapy and a Team Approach. November 2001. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/factsheets/diabetes/diabria/diabtab1.html