Endnotes

Evaluation of the Use of AHRQ and Other Quality Indicators (PDF)

 

1. Belcher DW, Berg AO, Inui TS. Practical approaches to providing better preventive care: are physicians a problem or a solution? In: Batista RN, Lawrence RS, eds. Implementing Preventive Services. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 1988; 4 (suppl):27-48.

2. Nutting PA. Health promotion in primary medical care: problems and potential. Preventive Medicine 1986; 15:537-48.

3. McPhee SJ, Bird JA. Implementation of cancer prevention guidelines in clinical practice. Journal of Internal Medicine 1990; 5(suppl):S116-22.

4. Osborn EH, Bird JA, McPhee S-J, et al. Cancer screening by primary care physicians: can we explain the differences? Journal of Family Practice 1991; 32:465-71.

5. Henry RC, Ogle KS, Snellman LA. Preventive medicine: physician practices, beliefs, and perceived barriers for implementation. Family Medicine 1987; 19:110-3.

6. Rosen MA, Demak MM. Prevention and health promotion in primary care: baseline results on physicians from the INSURE project on lifecycle preventive health services. Preventive Medicine 1984;13:535-48.

7. Stange KC, Fedirko T, Zyzanski SJ, Jaen CR. How do family physicians prioritize delivery of multiple preventive services? Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:231-7.

8. Kamerow DB. Prioritizing Prevention. Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:229-30.

9. Mehrotra A, Epstein AM, and Rosenthal MB. Do integrated medical groups provide higher-quality medical care than individual practice associations? Annals of Internal Medicine 2006; 145:826-833.

10. Belcher DW, Berg AO, Inui TS. Practical approaches to providing better preventive care: are physicians a problem or a solution? In: Batista RN, Lawrence RS, eds. Implementing Preventive Services. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 1988; 4(suppl):27-48.

11. Nutting PA. Health promotion in primary medical care: problems and potential. Preventive Medicine 1986; 15:537-48.

12. McPhee SJ, Bird JA. Implementation of cancer prevention guidelines in clinical practice. Journal of Internal Medicine 1990; 5(suppl):S116-22.

13. Osborn EH, Bird JA, McPhee SJ, et al. Cancer screening by primary care physicians: can we explain the differences? Journal of Family Practice 1991; 32:465-71.

14. Henry RC, Ogle KS, Snellman LA. Preventive medicine: physician practices, beliefs, and perceived barriers for implementation. Family Medicine 1987; 19:110-3.

15. Rosen MA, Demak MM. Prevention and health promotion in primary care: baseline results on physicians from the INSURE project on lifecycle preventive health services. Preventive Medicine 1984; 13:535-48.

16. Stange KC, Fedirko T, Zyzanski SJ, Jaen CR. How do family physicians prioritize delivery of multiple preventive services? Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:231.

17. Kamerow DB. Prioritizing Prevention. Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:229.

18. Medder JD, Kahn NB, Susman JL. Risk factors and recommendations for 230 Adult primary care patients, based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Guidelines. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 1992; 8:150-53.

19. Practice volume was characterized by the number of patients seen per hour: low volume at 2.1 patients per hour, medium volume at 3.3 patients per hour, and high volume at 5.1 patients per hour.

20. Zyzanski SJ, Stange KC, Langa D, Flocke SA. Trade-offs in high-volume primary care practices. Journal of Family Practice 1998; 46:397.

21. Ibid.

22. Stange KC, Fedirko T, Zyzanski SJ, Jaen CR. How do family physicians prioritize delivery of multiple preventive services? Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:231.

23. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1996.

24. Stange KC, Flocke SA, Goodwin MA. Opportunistic preventive services delivery: are time limitations and patient satisfaction barriers? Journal of Family Practice 1998; 46:419.

25. Figures do not include height, weight, or blood pressure readings.

26. Ibid.

27. On average family practice physicians spend 17.1 minutes per patient according to the 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Survey.

28. Cooper GS, Goodwin MA, Stange KC. The delivery of preventive services for patient symptoms. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2001; 21(3):177-181.

29. Carney CP, Allen J, Doebbeling BN. Receipt of clinical preventive medical services among psychiatric patients. Psychiatric Services 2002; 53(8):1028-1030.

30. Yarnall KSH, Pollak, KI, Krause KM, et al. Primary care: is there enough time for prevention? American Journal of Public Health 2003; 93:635-641.

31. Stange KC, Fedirko T, Zyzanski SJ, Jaen CR. How do family physicians prioritize delivery of multiple preventive services? Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:231.

32. Maciosek MV, Coffield AB, McGinnis JM, et al. Methods for priority setting among clinical preventive services. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2001; 21:10-19. See also Coffield AB, Maciosek MV, McGinnis JM, et al. Priorities among recommended clinical preventive services. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2001; 21:1-9.

33. Maciosek MV, Coffield AB, Edwards NM, Flottemesch TJ, Goodman MJ, Solberg, LI. Priorities among effective clinical preventive services: Results of a systematic review and analysis. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2006; 31:52-61.

34. Saha S, Hoerger TJ, Pignone MP, Teutsch SM, Helfand M, Mandelblatt JS. [USPSTF Cost Work Group] The art and science of incorporating cost-effectiveness into evidence-based recommendations for clinical preventive services. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2001; 20(suppl 3):36-43.

35. James PA, Cowan TM, Graham RP, Majeroni GB. Family physicians' attitudes about and use of clinical practice guidelines. Journal of Family Practice 1997; 45:341.

36. Solberg LI, Brekke ML, Kottke TE. How important are clinician and nurse attitudes to the delivery of clinical preventive services? Journal of Family Practice 1997; 44:451.

37. Atkins D, DiGuiseppi CG. Broadening the evidence base for evidence-based guidelines. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 1998; 14: 335-44.

38. Solberg LI, Kottke TE, Brekke ML, Conn SA, Magnan S, Amundson G. The case of the missing clinical preventive services systems. Effective Clinical Practice 1998; 1:33-38.

39. Frame PS, Zimmer JG, Werth PL, Hall WJ, et al. Computer-based vs. manual health maintenance tracking. Archives of Family Medicine 1994; 3:581-8.

40. Cargill VA, Conti M, Neuhauser D, McClish D. Improving the effectiveness of screening for colorectal cancer by involving nurse clinicians. Medical Care 1991; 29:1-5.

41. Duncan C, Cummings SR, Stein MJ. Staff involvement and special follow-up time increase physicians' counseling about smoking cessation: a controlled trial. American Journal of Public Health 1991; 81:899-901.

42. Health maintenance protocol in a family practice setting (tips from other journals). American Family Physician 1991; 43:1002.

43. Hahn DL and Berger MG. Implementation of a systematic health maintenance protocol in a private practice. Journal of Family Practice 1990; 31:492-504.

44. Stange KC, Fedirko T, Zyzanski SJ, Jaen CR. How do family physicians prioritize delivery of multiple preventive services? Journal of Family Practice 1994; 38:231.

45. Stange KC, Flocke SA, Goodwin MA. Opportunistic preventive services delivery: are time limitations and patient satisfaction barriers? Journal of Family Practice 1998; 46:419.

46. Merenstein D, Rabinowitz H, Louis DZ. Health care plan decisions regarding preventive services. Archives of Family Medicine 1999; 8:354-356.

47. Ibid.

48. Mehrotra A, Epstein AM, Rosenthal MB. Do integrated medical groups provide higher-quality medical care than individual practice associations? Annals of Internal Medicine 2006; 145:826-833.

49. Shojania KG, Grimshaw JM. Evidence-based quality improvement: the state of the science. Health Affairs 2005; 24:138-50.

50. Keating NL, Landrum MB, Landon BE, Ayanian JZ, Borbas C, Wolf R, et al. The influence of physicians' practice management strategies and financial arrangements on quality of care among patients with diabetes. Medical Care 2004; 42:829-839.

51. Solberg LI, Kottke TE, Brekke ML, Magnan S, Davidson G, Calomeni CA, Conn SA, Amundson GM, Nelson AF. Failure of a continuous quality improvement intervention to increase the delivery of preventive services: a randomized trial. Effective Clinical Practice 2000; 3:105-115.

52. Shaw JS, Wasserman RC, Barry S, Delaney T, Duncan P, Davis W, Berry P. Statewide quality improvement outreach improves preventive services for young children. Pediatrics 2006; 118:1039-1047.

53. Shafer MB, Tebb KP, Pantell RH, Wibbelsman CJ, Neuhaus JM, Tipton AC, Kunin SB, Ko TH, Schweppe DM, Bergman DA. Effect of a clinical practice improvement intervention on chlamydia screening among adolescent girls. Journal of the American Medical Association 2002; 288:2846-2852.

54. Kim CS, Kristopaitis RJ, Stone E, Pelter M, Sandhu M, Weingarten, SR. Physician education and report cards: do they make the grade? Results from a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Medicine 1999; 107:556-560.

55. Each plan used a slightly different title for this position.

56. The ePSS was designed to help clinicians identify and offer the USPSTF preventive services that are appropriate for their patients. The ePSS is available as both a web-based tool and a downloadable PDA application that can be used to search the USPSTF recommendations by specific patient characteristics, such as age, sex, and selected behavioral risk factors.

57. "Clinical thought leaders" were described as "experts" in particular clinical areas. The closed-panel plan has three for internal medicine, three for pediatrics, one for oncology, and one for most other medical specialties. These clinical experts play a role in both reviewing and adopting the clinical preventive guidelines at the regional level.

58. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for prostate cancer using prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing or digital rectal examination (DRE).

59. Due to the range of answers we received to the question, "Are all or some of the services that are recommended by the Task Force, the "A" and "B" recommendations, being delivered throughout your healthcare system," we were not able to present the findings in a more quantitatively rigorous manner.

60. Managed Healthcare: An Introduction, Academy for Healthcare Management, 2001, 3d Ed.

61. Sittig DF, Krall MA, Dykstra RH, Russell A, Chin HL. A survey of factors affecting clinician acceptance of clinical decision support. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision-making 2006; 6:6.

62. Chaudhry B, Wang J, Wu S, Maglione M, Mojica W, Roth E, Morton SC, and Shekelle PG. Systematic Review: Impact of Health Information Technology on Quality, Efficiency and Costs of Medical Care. Annals of Internal Medicine 2006; 144:742-752.

63. Electronic Medical/ Health Records. AHRQ National Resource Center for Health Information Technology. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Available at http://healthit.ahrq.gov. Accessed December 2006.

64. Ibid.

65. Schneider E, Riehl V, Courte-Wiencke S, Eddy D, Sennett C. Enhancing Performance Measurement: NCQA's Roadmap for a Health Information Framework. Journal of the American Medical Association 1999; 82(12):1184-90.

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Page last reviewed December 2007
Internet Citation: Endnotes: Evaluation of the Use of AHRQ and Other Quality Indicators (PDF). December 2007. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/final-reports/uspstf/notes.html