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Highlights

Women at High Risk for Diabetes: Access and Quality of Health Care, 20

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) are pleased to release this report, Women at High Risk for Diabetes: Access and Quality of Health Care, 2003-2006, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This collaboration examined the quality of preventive health care received by U.S. women at high risk and not at high risk for diabetes, using the most scientifically based measures and national data sources available. The report presents measures of health care quality showing the use of services in several areas: access to care, general health and well-being, and preventive care and behaviors. It should be noted that the data used (2003-2006) will not capture any recent changes in access to and quality of care.

This Highlights section offers a concise overview of findings from this report. The findings indicate that, among women at high risk and not at high risk for diabetes, disparities exist in access to and quality of care.

General Health and Well-Being

  • Overall, women at high risk for diabetes were more likely than women not at high risk for diabetes to report fair/poor health. Regardless of diabetes risk status, fair/poor health was more commonly reported by minority women, women with low levels of education, and women who lived in low-income families.
  • Overall, women at high risk for diabetes were more likely than women not at high risk for diabetes to be aware of having major risk factors for diabetes (hypertension, overweight).
  • Regardless of diabetes risk status, awareness of hypertensive status was lowest among Mexican-American women and highest among African-American women. Awareness of overweight status was lowest among minority women and decreased as education or family income decreased.
  • Overall, women at high risk for diabetes were less likely than women not at high risk for diabetes to smoke or consume alcohol. However, alcohol consumption was most commonly reported by non-Hispanic women and women with high levels of education or family income.

Access to Care

  • Among non-Hispanic whites, women at high risk for diabetes were significantly more likely than women not at high risk for diabetes to have only public health insurance coverage during the year. No significant differences were found among non-Hispanic or Mexican-American women.
  • Regardless of diabetes risk status, non-Hispanic black women were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic white women to have only public health insurance coverage during the year.
  • Regardless of diabetes risk status, women with a high school education or less were significantly more likely than women with more than a high school education to have been uninsured all year.

Diabetes-Related Risk Reduction

  • Women at high risk for diabetes were significantly less likely than women not at high risk for diabetes to report that they exercised for at least 150 minutes per week.
  • Women at high risk for diabetes who had a high school education or less were significantly less likely than women at high risk for diabetes who had more than a high school education to have tried to lose weight in the past year.

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Page last reviewed January 2011
Internet Citation: Highlights: Women at High Risk for Diabetes: Access and Quality of Health Care, 20. January 2011. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/final-reports/women-and-diabetes-2003-2006/wmhrdiab1.html