Dental Care

Women With Diabetes: Quality of Health Care, 2004-2005

Diabetes is an important risk factor for dental complications, such as periodontal disease and tooth loss.59 Women and men with diagnosed diabetes are less likely than those without diabetes to have seen a dentist within the preceding 12 months.60 The American Academy of Periodontology recommends regular dental visits at least once annually for prevention, early detection, and treatment.61

Women who reported a dental visit in the past year, by diagnosed diabetes status and gender, 2004

Bar charts show percentage of women who reported a dental visit in the past year. By diagnosed diabetes status: Women with diagnosed diabetes, 38%; women without diabetes, 48%; all women, 47%. By gender: Women with diagnosed diabetes: Total, 38%; Ages 18-44, 43%; Ages 45-66, 40%; Age 65 and over, 35%. Men with diagnosed diabetes: Total, 40%; Ages 18-44, not given; Ages 45-66, 39%; Age 65 and over, 46%.

*Estimate for men ages 18-44 did not meet sample size criteria.

Source: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2004.

Appendix table number: Tables 26a and 26b.

  • Women with diagnosed diabetes were significantly less likely than women without diabetes to have had a dental visit in the past year.
  • No significant difference was found between women and men with diagnosed diabetes who reported having had a dental visit in the past year, either overall or for adults ages 18-44 or age 65 and over. However, among adults ages 45-64, those with diabetes were significantly less likely than those without diabetes to report a dental visit in the past year (data not shown).
Current as of November 2008
Internet Citation: Dental Care: Women With Diabetes: Quality of Health Care, 2004-2005. November 2008. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/final-reports/women-and-diabetes-2004-2005/wmdiab10.html