2012 National Healthcare Disparities Report

Chapter 10. Priority Populations (continued)

Priority Populations Appendix

For each population listed below, chapters with relevant figures are listed, along with the figure numbers and topics. If a chapter is not listed, no figures in that chapter relate to the group of interest.

Women

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.3—Adults age 50 and over who have advanced stage colorectal cancer per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.5—Age-adjusted colorectal cancer deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.6—Adults who received a blood pressure measurement in the last 2 years and can state whether their blood pressure was normal or high.
  • Figure 2.7—Adults with hypertension whose blood pressure is under control.
  • Figure 2.8—Inpatient deaths per 1,000 adult hospital admissions with heart attack.
  • Figure 2.9—Hospital patients with heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction prescribed ACE inhibitor or ARB at discharge.
  • Figure 2.10—Adult admissions for congestive heart failure per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.11—New adult end stage renal disease patients beginning nephrology care more than 12 months before start of dialysis.
  • Figure 2.12—Incident adult hemodialysis patients who used an arteriovenous fistula at first outpatient dialysis.
  • Figure 2.14—Dialysis patients who were registered on a waiting list for transplantation.
  • Figure 2.18—End stage renal disease due to diabetes per million population.
  • Figure 2.19—New AIDS cases per 100,000 population age 13 and over.
  • Figure 2.26—Adolescents ages 13-15 who ever received at least 1 dose of the meningococcal vaccine.
  • Figure 2.27—Adults and adolescents with a major depressive episode in the past year who received treatment for depression in the past year.
  • Figure 2.30—People age 12 and over treated for substance abuse who completed treatment course.
  • Figure 2.31—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence-based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition.
  • Figure 2.32—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise.
  • Figure 2.33—Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction.
  • Figure 2.36—Hospital patients with pneumonia who received recommended hospital care.
  • Figure 2.37—Patients with tuberculosis who completed a curative course of treatment within 1 year of initiation of treatment.
  • Figure 2.39—People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
  • Figure 2.40—Adult current smokers with a checkup in the last 12 months who received advice to quit smoking.
  • Figure 2.41—Adults with obesity age 20 and over who reported being told by a doctor they were overweight.
  • Figure 2.42—Obese children and teens ages 2-19 who were told by a doctor or health professional that they were obese.
  • Figure 2.43—Adults with obesity who ever received advice from a health provider to exercise more.
  • Figure 2.44—Adults with obesity who did not spend half an hour or more in moderate or vigorous physical activity at least three times a week.
  • Figure 2.47—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about healthy eating.
  • Figure 2.51—Changes in total functional gain among patients with all diagnoses in inpatient rehabilitation facilities.
  • Figure 2.53—Short-stay and high-risk long-stay nursing home residents with pressure sores.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.19—Adjusted percentages of adults ages 40-64 with diagnosed diabetes who received four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year.
  • Figure 2.25—Adults with HIV who received recommended care.
  • Figure 2.26—HIV infection deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.34—People age 12 and over who needed treatment for illicit drug use or an alcohol problem and who received such treatment at a specialty facility in the last 12 months.
Quality Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.3—Adult admissions with central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections per 1,000 medical and surgical discharges of length 2 or more days.
Disparities Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.2—Adult surgery patients with postoperative catheter-associated urinary tract infection.
  • Figure 3.4.—Mechanical adverse events associated with central venous catheter placement.
Quality Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.1—Hospitalized adult patients with heart failure who were given complete written discharge instructions.
Quality Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.9—Perforated appendixes per 1,000 admissions for appendicitis.
Disparities Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.1—Adults age 65 and over who received potentially inappropriate prescription medications in the calendar year.
  • Figure 7.3—Potentially avoidable emergency department visit rates.
  • Figure 7.4—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to mental health and alcohol or substance abuse, per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 7.5—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to dental issues, per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 7.9—Perforated appendixes per 1,000 admissions for appendicitis, age 18 and over, in IHS, Tribal, and contract hospitals.
Quality Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
Disparities Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
  • Figure 8.6—Trauma center utilization for severe injuries in the United States.
Quality Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.1—People under age 65 with health insurance.
  • Figure 9.2—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.5—People with a specific source of ongoing care.

Children

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.14—Dialysis patients who were registered on a waiting list for transplantation.
  • Figure 2.19—New AIDS cases per 100,000 population age 13 and over.
  • Figure 2.22—Infants born in 2009 whose mothers had obtained early and adequate prenatal care.
  • Figure 2.23—Children ages 19-35 months who received the 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 vaccine series.
  • Figure 2.24—Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider.
  • Figure 2.25—Children ages 0-17 with a well visit in the last 12 months.
  • Figure 2.26—Adolescents ages 13-15 who ever received at least 1 dose of the meningococcal vaccine.
  • Figure 2.27—Adults and adolescents with a major depressive episode in the past year who received treatment for depression in the past year.
  • Figure 2.28—Suicide deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.29—People age 12 and over who needed treatment for illicit drug use or an alcohol problem and who received such treatment at a specialty facility in the last 12 months.
  • Figure 2.30—People age 12 and over treated for substance abuse who completed treatment course.
  • Figure 2.37—Patients with tuberculosis who completed a curative course of treatment within 1 year of initiation of treatment.
  • Figure 2.38—People with current asthma who reported taking preventive asthma medicine daily or almost daily.
  • Figure 2.39—People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
  • Figure 2.42—Obese children and teens ages 2-19 who were told by a doctor or health professional that they were obese.
  • Figure 2.45—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider gave advice within the past 2 years about exercise.
  • Figure 2.47—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about healthy eating.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.27—Absolute differences between percentages of White and Black infants born in 2009 whose mothers had obtained early and adequate prenatal care.
  • Figure 2.28—Children ages 19-35 months who received the 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 vaccine series.
  • Figure 2.29—Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider.
  • Figure 2.30—Children ages 0-17 with a well visit in the last 12 months.
  • Figure 2.31—Adolescents ages 13-15 who ever received at least 1 dose of the meningococcal vaccine.
  • Figure 2.32—Adults and adolescents with a major depressive episode in the past year who received treatment for depression in the past year.
  • Figure 2.48—Obese children and teens ages 2-19 who were told by a doctor or health professional that they were obese.
  • Figure 2.51—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider gave advice within the past 2 years about exercise.
  • Figure 2.53—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about healthy eating.
Quality Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.5—Bloodstream infections per 1,000 central-line days, by type of pediatric intensive care unit and birth weight of child.
  • Figure 3.7—Obstetric trauma with 3rd or 4th degree laceration per 1,000 vaginal deliveries without instrument assistance.
Quality Report—Chapter 4: Timeliness
  • Figure 4.2—Children who needed care right away for an illness, injury, or condition in the last 12 months who sometimes or never got care as soon as wanted.
  • Figure 4.3—Emergency department visits in which patient had to wait an hour or more by urgency.
Quality Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.2—Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers.
  • Figure 5.3—State variation: Children whose parents reported poor communication with health providers.
Disparities Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figures 5.3 and 5.4—Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers.
Quality Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.5—Effective care coordination among children with special health care needs.
  • Figure 6.6—Children with special health care needs with a medical home.
Disparities Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.4—Effective care coordination among children with special health care needs.
  • Figure 6.5—Children with special health care needs with a medical home.
Quality Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.3—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to mental health and alcohol or substance abuse.
Quality Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
Quality Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.1—People under age 65 with health insurance.
  • Figure 9.2—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.5—People with a specific source of ongoing care.
  • Figure 9.6—People with a usual primary care provider.
  • Figure 9.7—People who were unable to get or delayed in getting needed medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines in the last 12 months.

Low-Income Populations

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.23—Children ages 19-35 months who received the 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 vaccine series.
  • Figure 2.35—Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.1—Adults ages 50-75 who reported having colorectal cancer screening.
  • Figure 2.2—State variation in disparities related to income: Adults ages 50-75 who reported having colorectal cancer screening.
  • Figure 2.5—Patients with colon cancer who received surgical resection of colon cancer that included at least 12 lymph nodes pathologically examined.
  • Figure 2.9—Adults with hypertension whose blood pressure is under control.
  • Figure 2.10—Inpatient deaths per 1,000 adult hospital admissions with heart attack.
  • Figure 2.12—Adult admissions for congestive heart failure per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.18—Adults age 40 and over with diagnosed diabetes who reported receiving four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year (2+ HbA1c tests, foot exam, dilated eye exam, and flu shot).
  • Figure 2.19—Composite measure: Adjusted percentages of adults ages 40-64 with diagnosed diabetes who received four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year.
  • Figure 2.21—Hospital admissions for uncontrolled diabetes per 100,000 population, age 18 and over.
  • Figure 2.29—Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider.
  • Figure 2.30—Children ages 0-17 years with a well visit in the last 12 months.
  • Figure 2.31—Adolescents ages 13-15 who ever received at least 1 dose of the meningococcal vaccine.
  • Figure 2.36—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition. —Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise.
  • Figure 2.38—Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction. —Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
  • Figure 2.44—People with current asthma who report taking preventive asthma medicine daily or almost daily. —People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
  • Figure 2.48—Obese children and teens ages 2-19 who were told by a doctor or health professional that they were obese.
  • Figure 2.49—Adults with obesity who ever received advice from a health provider to exercise more.
  • Figure 2.51—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider gave advice within the past 2 years about exercise.
  • Figure 2.53—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about healthy eating.
Quality Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.1—Postoperative sepsis per 1,000 adult elective-surgery discharges with an operating room procedure.
Disparities Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.3—Admissions with central line-associated bloodstream infections per 1,000 medical and surgical discharges of length 2 or more days.
  • Figure 3.5—Obstetric trauma with 3rd or 4th degree laceration per 1,000 vaginal deliveries without instrument assistance.
Disparities Report—Chapter 4: Timeliness
  • Figure 4.1—Adults who needed care right away for an illness, injury, or condition in the last 12 months who sometimes or never got care as soon as wanted.
Disparities Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.1—Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months who reported poor communication with health providers.
  • Figure 5.2—Adult ambulatory patients who reported poor communication with health providers, by race/ethnicity, stratified by income.
  • Figure 5.4—Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers, by insurance status, stratified by income.
Quality Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.3—People with a usual source of care whose health provider usually asks about prescription medications and treatments from other doctors.
Disparities Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.4—Effective care coordination among children with special health care needs.
  • Figure 6.5—Children with special health care needs with a medical home.
Disparities Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.2—Potentially avoidable hospitalization rates for adults.
  • Figure 7.3—Potentially avoidable emergency department visit rates.
  • Figure 7.4—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to mental health and alcohol or substance abuse, per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 7.5—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to dental issues, per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 7.7—Excess number of potentially preventable hospitalizations.
  • Figure 7.8—Perforated appendixes per 1,000 admissions for appendicitis, age 18 and over.
Disparities Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
  • Figure 8.6—Trauma center utilization for severe injuries in the United States.
  • Figure 8.7—Race, ethnicity, and income of patients receiving care in an HSHC, United States.
Disparities Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.1—People under age 65 with health insurance.
  • Figure 9.2—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.3—Predicted percentages of adults ages 18-64 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.5—People under age 65 whose family's health insurance premium and out-of-pocket medical expenses were more than 10% of total family income.
  • Figure 9.6—People with a specific source of ongoing care.
  • Figure 9.7—People with a usual primary care provider.
  • Figure 9.8—People who were unable to get or delayed in getting needed medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines.

People With Low Education

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.29—People age 12 and over who needed treatment for illicit drug use or an alcohol problem and who received such treatment at a specialty facility in the last 12 months.
  • Figure 2.34—Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.8—Adults who received a blood pressure measurement in the last 2 years and can state whether their blood pressure was normal or high.
  • Figure 2.19—Adjusted percentages of adults ages 40-64 with diagnosed diabetes who received four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year.
  • Figure 2.35—People age 12 and over treated for substance abuse who completed treatment course. —Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition.
  • Figure 2.37—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise. —Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction.
  • Figure 2.40—State variation in disparities related to education: Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. —People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
  • Figure 2.46—Adult current smokers with a checkup in the last 12 months who received advice from a doctor to quit smoking.
  • Figure 2.47—Adults with obesity age 20 and over who reported being told by a doctor they were overweight.
  • Figure 2.50—Adults with obesity who did not spend half an hour or more in moderate or vigorous physical activity at least three times a week.
  • Figure 2.52—Adults with obesity who ever received advice from a health provider about eating fewer high-fat or high-cholesterol foods.
Quality Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.5—Adults with a usual source of care whose health providers sometimes or never asked for the patient's help to make treatment decisions.
Disparities Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.5—Adult hospital patients who reported poor communication with nurses and doctors.
Disparities Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.2—People with a usual source of care whose health provider usually asks about prescription medications and treatments from other doctors.
Disparities Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.3—Predicted percentages of adults ages 18-64 who were uninsured all year.

Uninsured People

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.1—Adults ages 50-75 who reported having colorectal cancer screening.
  • Figure 2.4—Patients with colon cancer who received surgical resection of colon cancer that included at least 12 lymph nodes pathologically examined.
  • Figure 2.6—Adults who received a blood pressure measurement in the last 2 years and can state whether their blood pressure was normal or high.
  • Figure 2.8—Inpatient deaths per 1,000 adult hospital admissions with heart attack.
  • Figure 2.20—HIV patients who received recommended care.
  • Figure 2.25—Children ages 0-17 with a well visit in the last 12 months.
  • Figure 2.31—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence-based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition.
  • Figure 2.32—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise.
  • Figure 2.33—Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction.
  • Figure 2.34—Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
  • Figure 2.38—People with current asthma who reported taking preventive asthma medicine daily or almost daily.
  • Figure 2.39—People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
  • Figure 2.40—Adult current smokers with a checkup in the last 12 months who received advice to quit smoking.
  • Figure 2.44—Adults with obesity who did not spend half an hour or more in moderate or vigorous physical activity at least three times a week.
  • Figure 2.46—Adults with obesity who ever received advice from a health provider about eating fewer high-fat or high-cholesterol foods.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.19—Adjusted percentages of adults ages 40-64 with diagnosed diabetes who received four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year.
Quality Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.3—Admissions with central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection per 1,000 medical and surgical discharges of length 2 or more days.
  • Figure 3.7—Obstetric trauma with 3rd or 4th degree laceration per 1,000 vaginal deliveries without instrument assistance.
Disparities Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.1—Postoperative sepsis per 1,000 adult elective-surgery discharges with an operating room procedure.
Quality Report—Chapter 4: Timeliness
  • Figure 4.2—Children who needed care right away for an illness, injury, or condition in the last 12 months who sometimes or never got care as soon as wanted.
Disparities Report—Chapter 4: Timeliness
  • Figure 4.3—Emergency department visits in which patient had to wait an hour or more.
Quality Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.1—Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months who reported poor communication with health providers.
  • Figure 5.2—Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers.
Disparities Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.4—Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers.
Quality Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.3. People with a usual source of care whose health provider usually asks about prescription medications and treatments from other doctors.
  • Figure 6.5—Effective care coordination among children with special health care needs.
  • Figure 6.6—Children with special health care needs with a medical home.
Quality Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.1—Adults age 65 and over who received potentially inappropriate prescription medications in the calendar year.
Quality Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
Quality Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.2—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.3—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year, California,.
  • Figure 9.4—People under age 65 whose family's health insurance premium and out-of-pocket medical expenses were more than 10% of total family income.
  • Figure 9.5—People with a specific source of ongoing care.
  • Figure 9.6—People with a usual primary care provider.
  • Figure 9.7—People who were unable to get or delayed in getting needed medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines in the last 12 months.
Disparities Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.2—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.3—Predicted percentages of adults ages 18-64 who were uninsured all year.
  • Figure 9.4—People under age 65 who were uninsured all year, Hispanics and Asians, California.

Residents of Rural Areas

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.4—Patients with colon cancer who received surgical resection of colon cancer that included at least 12 lymph nodes pathologically examined.
  • Figure 2.5—Age-adjusted colorectal cancer deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.15—Adults age 40 and over with diagnosed diabetes who reported receiving four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year (2+ hemoglobin A1c tests, foot exam, dilated eye exam, and flu shot).
  • Figure 2.17—Hospital admissions for uncontrolled diabetes per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.21—HIV infection deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.26—Adolescents ages 13-15 who ever received at least 1 dose of the meningococcal vaccine.
  • Figure 2.28—Suicide deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.31—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence-based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition.
  • Figure 2.32—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise.
  • Figure 2.33—Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction.
  • Figure 2.39—People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.19—Adjusted percentages of adults ages 40-64 with diagnosed diabetes who received four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year.
Disparities Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.3—Admissions with central line-associated bloodstream infections per 1,000 medical and surgical discharges of length 2 or more days, by hospital geographic location.
Quality Report—Chapter 4: Timeliness
  • Figure 4.1—Adults who needed care right away for an illness, injury, or condition in the last 12 months who sometimes or never got care as soon as wanted.
  • Figure 4.2—Children who needed care right away for an illness, injury, or condition in the last 12 months who sometimes or never got care as soon as wanted.
  • Figure 4.3—Emergency department visits in which patient had to wait an hour or more.
Disparities Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.3—Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers.
Disparities Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.3—Hospitals with electronic exchange of patient information on medication history, by region and geographic location, with hospitals outside their system and with ambulatory providers outside their system.
Quality Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.2—Potentially avoidable emergency department visit rates.
  • Figure 7.3—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to mental health and alcohol or substance abuse.
  • Figure 7.4—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to dental issues.
Quality Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
  • Figure 8.4—U.S. active non-Federal general and specialist physicians and surgeons, by geographic region and metropolitan status.
  • Figure 8.5—Trauma center utilization for severe injuries in the United States.
Disparities Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
  • Figure 8.3—Electronic health record use in physician offices.
  • Figure 8.9—Medicaid and uninsured discharges, by facility characteristics, U.S. short-term acute hospitals.
Quality Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.5—People with a specific source of ongoing care.

People With Special Health Care Needs

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.24—Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider.
  • Figure 2.43—Adults with obesity who ever received advice from a health provider to exercise more.
  • Figure 2.45—Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider gave advice within the past 2 years about exercise.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.36—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition. —Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise.
  • Figure 2.38—Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction. —People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
Quality Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.5—Effective care coordination among children with special health care needs.
  • Figure 6.6—Children with special health care needs with a medical home.
Disparities Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.4—Effective care coordination among children with special health care needs.
  • Figure 6.5—Children with special health care needs with a medical home.
Quality Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.4—People under age 65 whose family's health insurance premium and out-of-pocket medical expenses were more than 10% of total family income.

Older Adults

Quality Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.1—Adults ages 50-75 who reported having colorectal cancer screening.
  • Figure 2.2—State variation: Adults ages 50-75 who reported having colorectal cancer screening.
  • Figure 2.3—Adults age 50 and over who have advanced stage colorectal cancer, per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.7—Adults with hypertension whose blood pressure is under control.
  • Figure 2.9—Hospital patients with heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction prescribed ACE inhibitor or ARB at discharge.
  • Figure 2.10—Adult admissions for congestive heart failure per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.11—New adult end stage renal disease patients beginning nephrology care more than 12 months before start of dialysis.
  • Figure 2.12—Incident adult hemodialysis patients who used an arteriovenous fistula at first outpatient dialysis.
  • Figure 2.14—Dialysis patients who were registered on a waiting list for transplantation.
  • Figure 2.15—Adults age 40 and over with diagnosed diabetes who reported receiving four recommended services for diabetes in the calendar year (2+ hemoglobin A1c tests, foot exam, dilated eye exam, and flu shot).
  • Figure 2.16—Adults age 40 and over with diagnosed diabetes with hemoglobin A1c and blood pressure under control.
  • Figure 2.17—Hospital admissions for uncontrolled diabetes per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.18—End stage renal disease due to diabetes per million population.
  • Figure 2.19—New AIDS cases per 100,000 population age 13 and over.
  • Figure 2.21—HIV infection deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.28—Suicide deaths per 100,000 population.
  • Figure 2.31—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they had effective, evidence-based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition.
  • Figure 2.32—Adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about physical activity or exercise.
  • Figure 2.33—Overweight adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported they received health care provider counseling about weight reduction.
  • Figure 2.34—Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
  • Figure 2.35—State variation: Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
  • Figure 2.36—Hospital patients with pneumonia who received recommended hospital care.
  • Figure 2.37—Patients with tuberculosis who completed a curative course of treatment within 1 year of initiation of treatment.
  • Figure 2.38—People with current asthma who reported taking preventive asthma medicine daily or almost daily.
  • Figure 2.39—People with current asthma who received a written asthma management plan from their health provider.
  • Figure 2.41-— Adults with obesity age 20 and over who reported being told by a doctor they were overweight.
  • Figure 2.46—Adults with obesity who ever received advice from a health provider about eating fewer high-fat or high-cholesterol foods.
  • Figure 2.48—Adult home health care patients whose ability to walk or move around improved.
  • Figure 2.49—Long-stay nursing home residents whose need for help with daily activities increased.
  • Figure 2.51—Changes in total functional gain among patients with all diagnoses in inpatient rehabilitation facilities.
  • Figure 2.52—Adult home health care patients who had less shortness of breath between the start and end of a home health care episode.
  • Figure 2.54—Hospice patients age 18 and over who did NOT receive the right amount of help for feelings of anxiety or sadness.
  • Figure 2.55—Hospice patients age 18 and over whose family caregivers wanted more information about what to expect while the patient was dying.
  • Figure 2.56—Hospice patients age 18 and over who did NOT receive care consistent with their stated end-of-life wishes.
Disparities Report—Chapter 2: Effectiveness
  • Figure 2.22—Hospital admissions for uncontrolled diabetes per 100,000 population in IHS, Tribal, and contract hospitals.
  • Figure 2.39—Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. State variation in disparities related to education: Adults age 65 and over who reported having influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.
Quality Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.1—Postoperative sepsis per 1,000 elective-surgery discharges with an operating room procedure.
  • Figure 3.2—Adult surgery patients with postoperative catheter-associated urinary tract infection.
Disparities Report—Chapter 3: Patient Safety
  • Figure 3.4—Mechanical adverse events associated with central venous catheter placement.
Quality Report—Chapter 4: Timeliness
  • Figure 4.1—Adults who needed care right away for an illness, injury, or condition in the last 12 months who sometimes or never got care as soon as wanted.
  • Figure 4.3—Emergency department visits in which patient had to wait an hour or more, by urgency.
  • Figure 4.4—Hospital patients with heart attack who received percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes.
  • Figure 4.5—Hospital patients with heart attack who received fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes.
Quality Report—Chapter 5: Patient Centeredness
  • Figure 5.1—Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months who reported poor communication with health providers.
  • Figure 5.4—Adult hospital patients who reported poor communication with nurses and doctors.
Quality Report—Chapter 6: Care Coordination
  • Figure 6.1—Hospitalized adult patients with heart failure who were given complete written discharge instructions.
Quality Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.1—Adults age 65 and over who received potentially inappropriate prescription medications in the calendar year.
  • Figure 7.2—Potentially avoidable emergency department visit rates.
  • Figure 7.3—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to mental health and alcohol or substance abuse.
  • Figure 7.4—Rate of emergency department visits with a principal diagnosis related to dental issues.
  • Figure 7.9—Perforated appendixes per 1,000 admissions for appendicitis.
Disparities Report—Chapter 7: Efficiency
  • Figure 7.1—Adults age 65 and over who received potentially inappropriate prescription medications in the calendar year.
  • Figure 7.9—Perforated appendixes per 1,000 admissions for appendicitis, age 18 and over, in IHS, Tribal, and contract hospitals.
Quality Report—Chapter 8: Health System Infrastructure
  • Figure 8.5—Trauma center utilization for severe injuries in the United States.
  • Figure 8.6—Characteristics of HSHC patients.
Quality Report—Chapter 9: Access to Care
  • Figure 9.5—People with a specific source of ongoing care.
  • Figure 9.6—People with a usual primary care provider.
  • Figure 9.7—People who were unable to get or delayed in getting needed medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines in the last 12 months.
Current as of May 2013
Internet Citation: 2012 National Healthcare Disparities Report: Chapter 10. Priority Populations (continued). May 2013. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/nhdr12/chap10b.html