Acknowledgements

Chapter 5 (Text Descriptions)

National Healthcare Quality Report, 2011



Figure 5.1. Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months who reported poor communication with health providers: Overall composite, by age and activity limitation, 2002-2008

Age 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Total 10.8% 9.8% 9.6% 9.7% 9.8% 9.3% 9.5%
18-44 13.1% 11.7% 11.7% 11.6% 11.3% 10.8% 11.5%
45-64 9.7% 9.2% 8.5% 8.8% 9.4% 9.1% 8.9%
65+ 7.4% 6.3% 6.6% 6.8% 7.4% 6.3% 6.4%



Activity Limitation 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Neither Basic nor Complex 10.3% 9.3% 8.8% 8.8% 9.1% 8.9% 8.7%
Complex 15.0% 13.5% 14.9% 15.4% 15.0% 13.9% 16.6%
Basic 12.8% 12.0% 12.3% 12.7% 12.6% 10.3% 12.7%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2008.

Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 18 and over who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.

Note: For this measure, lower rates are better.
Patients who report that their health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

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Figure 5.2. Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers: Overall composite, by age and special health care needs, 2002-2008

Age 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
0-5 6.9% 6.4% 6.1% 5.8% 5.2% 5.2% 4.7%
6-18 6.7% 5.9% 5.4% 5.4% 4.6% 4.8% 4.2%



Special Health Care Needs 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Children Without Special Health Care Needs 6.3% 5.8% 5.2% 5.4% 4.5% 4.6% 4.0%
Children With Special Health Care Needs 8.2% 7.1% 7.2% 6.1% 6.0% 5.9% 5.5%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2008.

Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population under age 18 who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.

Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. Parents who report that their child's health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

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Figure 5.3. Adult hospital patients who reported poor communication with nurses and doctors, by age, 2008

Age Communication With Nurses Communication With Doctors
Total 5.6% 5.3%
18-44 5.9% 5.0%
45-64 6.1% 5.7%
65+ 5.1% 5.1%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey, 2008.

Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. Poor communication is defined as responded "sometimes" or "never" to the set of survey questions: "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses treat you with courtesy and respect?" "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses listen carefully to you?" and "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses explain things in a way you could understand?"

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Figure 5.4. Adults with a usual source of care whose health providers sometimes or never asked for the patient's help to make treatment decisions, by age and insurance status, 2008

Age Percent
0-17 15.6%
18-44 16.3%
45-64 14.7%
65+ 16.0%



Insurance Status Percent
Private Insurance 14.8%
Public Insurance Only 17.5%
Uninsured 18.1%



Insurance Status Percent
Medicare and Private 15.5%
Medicare and Public 25.4%
Medicare Only 14.3%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2008.

Note: For this measure, lower rates are better.

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Page last reviewed October 2014
Internet Citation: Chapter 5 (Text Descriptions). October 2014. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/nhqr11/chap5txt.html