2012 National Healthcare Quality Report

Chapter 5, Text Descriptions for Figures

Figure 5.1. Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months who reported poor communication with health providers: Overall composite, by insurance, ages 18-64 and age 65 and over, 2002-2009

Insurance20022003200420052006200720082009
Any Private10.49.48.69.08.98.48.78.3
Public Only15.615.616.415.317.415.116.213.7
Uninsured18.816.718.816.416.217.315.317.6

 

Insurance20022003200420052006200720082009
Medicare Only8.76.87.37.87.67.05.76.2
Medicare and Private6.65.86.05.36.35.26.14.7
Medicare and Other Public8.68.68.612.012.58.710.79.6

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2009.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 18 and over who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. Patients who report that their health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

Return to Document

Figure 5.2. Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers: Overall composite, by insurance and primary language, 2002-2009

Insurance20022003200420052006200720082009
Any Private5.34.74.14.03.54.03.33.6
Public Only10.69.48.88.67.76.56.57.5
Uninsured7.36.49.57.25.77.26.34.4

 

Primary Language20022003200420052006200720082009
English6.35.65.45.04.64.54.14.3
Other11.79.58.08.76.77.15.98.0

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2009.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population under age 18 who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. Parents who report that their child's health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

Return to Document

Figure 5.3. State variation: Children whose parents reported poor communication with health providers

QuartileStates
First (best) QuartileColorado, Missouri, Wisconsin, Ohio, South Carolina, Delaware, Rhode Island
2nd QuartileWashington, Tennessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, Connecticut
3rd QuartileHawaii, Oregon, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Michigan, Virginia
4th (worst) QuartileCalifornia, Arizona, Texas, Kansas, Indiana, Florida, District of Columbia
MissingAlaska, Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, New York, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Puerto Rico

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2009.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population under age 18 who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.
Note: Parents who report that their child's health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

Return to Document

Figure 5.4. Adult hospital patients who reported poor communication with nurses and doctors, by age, 2007-2009

Age Group200720082009
18-446.25.95.6
45-646.46.15.8
65+5.45.14.9

 

Age Group200720082009
18-445.05.04.9
45-645.75.75.7
65+5.15.15.0

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Hospital CAHPS® (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) Survey, 2007-2009.
Denominator: Adult hospitalized patients.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. Poor communication is defined as responded "sometimes" or "never" to the set of survey questions: "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses treat you with courtesy and respect?" "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses listen carefully to you?" and "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses explain things in a way you could understand?"

Return to Document

Figure 5.5. Adults with a usual source of care whose health providers sometimes or never asked for the patient's help to make treatment decisions, by education, 2009

Education20022003200420052006200720082009
Any College19.416.716.216.515.71514.514.2
High School Grad22.62018.818.317.21616.216.8
<High School25.92320.220.320.119.718.719.8

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2009.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population with a usual source of care.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better.

Return to Document

Page last reviewed May 2013
Internet Citation: 2012 National Healthcare Quality Report: Chapter 5, Text Descriptions for Figures. May 2013. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/nhqr12/chap5-text.html