Effectiveness of Care: Maternal and Child Health

2008 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports

The National Healthcare Quality Report (NHQR) is a comprehensive national overview of quality of health care in the United States. It is organized around four dimensions of quality of care: effectiveness, patient safety, timeliness, and patient centeredness.

Maternity Care
Women who completed a pregnancy in the last 12 months who first received prenatal care in the first trimester
Live-born infants with low birth weight (<2,500 g, <1,500 g)
Infant deaths per 1,000 live births (total, <1,500 g, 1,500-2,499 g, ≥2,500 g)
Maternal deaths per 100,000 live births

Childhood Immunization
Composite measure: Children ages 19-35 months who received all recommended vaccines
Children ages 19-35 months who received 4 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine
Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of polio vaccine
Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine
Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine
Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine
Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of varicella vaccine

Other Childhood Preventive Care
Children who ever had their height and weight measured by a health provider
Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about the amount and kind of exercise, sports, or physically active hobbies they should have
Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about healthy eating
Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider
Children ages 2-17 who had a dental visit in the calendar year
Children ages 2-17 with untreated dental caries
Children for whom a health provider ever gave advice about how smoking in the house can be bad for a child
Children 0-40 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using child safety seats when riding in a car
Children 41-80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using booster seats when riding in a car
Children over 80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using lap or shoulder belts when riding in a car
Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle
People ages 2-19 who were overweight who were told by a health provider they were overweight
 


Maternity Care

Measure Title

Women who completed a pregnancy in the last 12 months who first received prenatal care in the first trimester.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

National Tables

6_1_1.1 Women who completed a pregnancy in the last 12 months who received prenatal care in the first trimester, United States, 1998 and 2005.

6_1_1.2 Women who completed a pregnancy in the last 12 months who received prenatal care in the first trimester, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

National Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics System - Natality (NVSS-N).

National Denominator

Number of live births.

National Numerator

Mothers of liveborn infants receiving prenatal care in the first trimester (3 months) of pregnancy.

State Tables

6_1_1.3 Women who completed a pregnancy in the last 12 months who received prenatal care in the first trimester, by State, 1998 and 2005.

State Data Source

CDC, NCHS, NVSS-N.

State Denominator

Number of live births, by State.

State Numerator

Same as national.

Comments

A description of the primary measurement used to determine the fetus's gestational age (the interval between the first day of the last normal menstrual period and the birth) has been published by the NCHS. See http://www.cdc.gov/nchs for more information about linked birth and infant death data.

This measure is referred to as measure 16-6a in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

This measure and its tables are also presented in other relevant sections of the National Healthcare Disparities Report.

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Maternity Care

Measure Title

Live-born infants with low birth weight (<2,500 g, <1,500 g).

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

National Tables

6_1_2.1 Live-born infants with low birth weight (less than 2,500 grams), United States, 1998 and 2005.

6_1_2.2 Live-born infants with very low birth weight (less than 1,500 grams), United States, 1998 and 2005.

6_1_2.3 Live-born infants with low birth weight (less than 2,500 grams), United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

6_1_2.4 Live-born infants with very low birth weight (less than 1,500 grams), United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

National Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics System - Natality (NVSS-N).

National Denominator

Number of live births.

National Numerator

Number of live births with birth weight of less than 2,500 grams (5 lb, 8 oz) or less than 1,500 grams (3 lb, 3 oz).

State Tables

6_1_2.5 Live-born infants with low birth weight (less than 2,500 grams), by State, 1998 and 2005.

6_1_2.6 Live-born infants with very low birth weight (less than 1,500 grams), by State, 1998 and 2005.

State Data Source

CDC, NCHS, NVSS-N.

State Denominator

Number of live births, by State.

State Numerator

Same as national.

Comments

This measure is referred to as measure 16-10 in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Maternity Care

Measure Title

Infant deaths per 1,000 live births (total, <1,500 g, 1,500-2,499 g, ≥2,500 g).

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

National Tables

6_1_3.1 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, all birth weights, United States, 1998 and 2005.

6_1_3.2 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight less than 1,500 grams, United States, 2002 and 2005.

6_1_3.3 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight 1,500-2,499 grams, United States, 2002 and 2005.

6_1_3.4 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight 2,500 grams or more, United States, 2002 and 2005.

6_1_3.5 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, all birth weights, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

6_1_3.6 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight less than 1,500 grams, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

6_1_3.7 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight 1,500-2,499 grams, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

6_1_3.8 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight 2,500 grams or more, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

National Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics System - Linked Birth and Infant Death Data (NVSS-I).

National Denominator

  1. Resident live births.
  2. Resident live births with birth weight less than 1,500 grams.
  3. Resident live births with birth weight of 1,500 to 2,499 grams.
  4. Resident live births with birth weight of 2,500 grams or more.

National Numerator

  1. Number of infant deaths within the first year.
  2. Number of infant deaths within the first year among live births with birth weight less than 1,500 grams.
  3. Number of infant deaths within the first year among live births with birth weight of 1,500 to 2,499 grams.
  4. Number of infant deaths within the first year among live births with birth weight of 2,500 grams or more.

State Tables

6_1_3.9 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, all birth weights, by State, 1998 and 2005.

6_1_3.10 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight <1,500 grams, by State, 2002 and 2005.

6_1_3.11 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight 1,500-2,499 grams, by State, 2002 and 2005.

6_1_3.12 Infant mortality per 1,000 live births, birth weight 2,500 grams or more, by State, 2002 and 2005.

State Data Source

CDC, NCHS, NVSS-I.

State Denominator

U.S. resident live births, by State.

State Numerator

Same as national.

Comments

In the Linked Birth and Infant Death Data file, the information from the death certificate is linked to information on the birth certificate for each infant under 1 year who died during the calendar year.

The number of deaths for infant mortality is based on a record weight from the linked birth and infant death file that adjusts for the approximately 2 to 3% of records each year that cannot be linked to their corresponding birth certificates.

This measure is referred to as measure 16-1c in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Maternity Care

Measure Title

Maternal deaths per 100,000 live births.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

National Tables

6_1_4.1 Maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, United States, 1999 and 2005.

6_1_4.2 Maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Education.

National Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics System - Mortality (NVSS-M).

National Denominator

U.S. resident live births.

National Numerator

Number of female deaths due to obstetric causes (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-10-CM] codes O00-O95, O98-O99) within 42 days of a pregnancy.

State Tables

6_1_4.3 Maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, by State, 1999 and 2005.

State Data Source

CDC, NCHS, NVSS-M.

State Denominator

Number of resident live births, by State.

State Numerator

Same as national.

Comments

Caution should be used when comparing these data with pregnancy-related mortality rates from other reports. NCHS uses the definition of maternal mortality and related coding conventions recommended in the ICD-10-CM by the World Health Organization. Other definitions may use different time intervals from pregnancy to death and may be more inclusive with regard to cause of death.

A description of the maternal mortality measurement has been published by NCHS. See http://www.cdc.gov/nchs for more information about linked birth and infant death data.

This measure is referred to as measure 16-4 in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Composite measure: Children ages 19-35 months who received all recommended vaccines.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

National Tables

6_2_1.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received all recommended vaccines (4:3:1:3:3), United States, 1998 and 2006.

6_2_1.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received all recommended vaccines (4:3:1:3:3), United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

National Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

National Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

National Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 4 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP), at least 3 doses of polio, at least 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), at least 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae B (Hib), and at least 3 doses of hepatitis B antigens.

State Tables

6_2_1.3 Children ages 19-35 months who received all recommended vaccines (4:3:1:3:3), by State, 2000 and 2006.

State Data Source

CDC, NCHS-NCIRD, NIS.

State Denominator

Same as national.

State Numerator

Same as national.

Comments

Race categories changed in 2001. Data for 2001 and later years may not be comparable with data from previous years.

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22 in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

The vaccines included in this measure are based on the corresponding Healthy People 2010 objective. These include at least 4 doses of DTaP vaccine; at least 3 doses of polio vaccine; at least 1 dose of MMR vaccine; at least 3 doses of Hib vaccine; and at least 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine. Between 1998 and 2005, the following vaccines were added to the list of recommended vaccines for children up to 35 months of age but were not added to this composite measure: pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) added in 2001 and influenza vaccine added in 2004. Varicella vaccine and vaccines added after 1998 to the recommended schedule for children up to 35 months of age also are not included in this composite measure.

This objective is one of the measures used to track the Immunization Leading Health Indicator.

This measure and its tables are also presented in other relevant sections of the National Healthcare Disparities Report.

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Children ages 19-35 months who received 4 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_2_2.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received 4 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, United States, 2001 and 2006.

6_2_2.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received 4 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 4 doses of the combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) antigens.

Comments

Statistical adjustments are made to minimize bias due to (1) lower coverage among children living in households without telephones, (2) discrepancies in reporting of vaccinations between households and immunization providers, and (3) differences in racial and ethnic population distribution in the sample compared with racial and ethnic population distribution at birth.

This baseline measure tracks the number of children ages 19-35 months receiving 4 or more doses of the DTaP vaccine, as well as children who received the combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis antigens (DTP).

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22a in Healthy People 2010 documentation

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of polio vaccine.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_2_3.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of polio vaccine, United States, 2001 and 2006.

6_2_3.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of polio vaccine, United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 3 doses of the polio antigen.

Comments

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22e in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_2_4.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, United States, 2001 and 2006.

6_2_4.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 1 dose of the combination of measles, mumps, and rubella antigens.

Comments

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22d in Healthy People 2010 documentation

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_2_5.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine, United States, 2001 and 2006.

6_2_5.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine, United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 3 doses of the Haemophilus influenzae B (Hib) antigen.

Comments

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22b in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_2_6.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine, United States, 2001 and 2006.

6_2_6.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine, United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 3 doses of the hepatitis B antigen.

Comments

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22c in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Childhood Immunization

Measure Title

Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of varicella vaccine.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_2_7.1 Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of varicella vaccine, United States, 2001 and 2006.

6_2_7.2 Children ages 19-35 months who received 1 dose of varicella vaccine, United States, 2006, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCHS-NCIRD), National Immunization Survey (NIS).

Denominator

U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population ages 19-35 months.

Numerator

Number of children ages 19-35 months receiving at least 1 dose of the varicella antigen.

Comments

This measure is referred to as measure 14-22f in Healthy People 2010 documentation.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children who ever had their height and weight measured by a health provider.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_1.1 Children who ever had their height and weight measured by a health provider, United States, 2005.

6_3_1.2 Children who ever had their height and weight measured by a health provider, United States, 2002.

6_3_1.3 Children who ever had their height and weight measured by a health provider, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children under age 18 for “Ever given advice” estimates, excluding nonrespondents to the questions of whether height and weight were measured by a doctor or other health provider. “Don't know” responses to the questions of when weight and height were measured were further excluded from “Within the past year” and “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Numerator

Children under age 18 who ever had both height and weight measured for “Ever had both measures” estimates. Children who had both measurements within the past year for “Within the past year” estimates. Children who had both measurements, either within the past year or 2 years for “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Comments

This measure combined weight and height measurements. The denominator and numerator were further modified regarding missing values and the combination.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about the amount and kind of exercise, sports, or physically active hobbies they should have.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_2.1 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about the amount and kind of exercise, sports, or physically active hobbies they should have, United States, 2005.

6_3_2.2 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about the amount and kind of exercise, sports, or physically active hobbies they should have, United States, 2002.

6_3_2.3 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about the amount and kind of exercise, sports, or physically active hobbies they should have, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children ages 2-17 for “Ever given advice” estimates, excluding nonrespondents to the question, “Has a doctor or other health provider ever given advice about the amount and kind of exercise, sports, or physically active hobbies you should have?” “Don't know” responses to the question of when the advice was given were further excluded from “Within the past year” and “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Numerator

Children ages 2-17 for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about the amount and kind of physical activity for “Ever given advice” estimates. Children who were given the advice within the past year for “Within the past year” estimates. Children who were given the advice within the past year or 2 years for “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Comments

This measure and its tables are also presented in other relevant sections of the National Healthcare Disparities Report.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about healthy eating.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_3.1 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about eating healthy, United States, 2005.

6_3_3.2 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about eating healthy, United States, 2002.

6_3_3.3 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about eating healthy, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children ages 2-17 for “Ever given advice” estimates, excluding nonrespondents to the question, “Has a doctor or other health provider ever given advice about eating healthy?” “Don't know” responses to the question of when the advice was given were further excluded for “Within the past year” and “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Numerator

Children ages 2-17 for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about eating healthy for “Ever given advice” estimates. Children who were given the advice within the past year for “Within the past year” estimates. Children who were given the advice within the past year or 2 years for “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_4.1 Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider, United States, 2002 and 2005.

6_3_4.2 Children ages 3-6 who ever had their vision checked by a health provider, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children ages 3-6. Nonresponses and “Don't know” responses were excluded.

Numerator

Children ages 3-6 whose vision had ever been checked by a doctor or other health provider.

Comments

This measure and its tables are also presented in other relevant sections of the National Healthcare Disparities Report.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children ages 2-17 who had a dental visit in the calendar year.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_3_5.1 Children ages 2-17 who had a dental visit in the calendar year, United States, 2002 and 2005.

6_3_5.2 Children ages 2-17 who had a dental visit in the calendar year, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Denominator

U.S. population ages 2-17.

Numerator

Number of children ages 2-17 who had a dental visit in the survey year.

Comments

The age used for the children with special health care needs (CSHCN) subset is the age during the interview rounds when the questions about whether the child needs special health care were asked. For other categories, it is the age at the end of the year.

This measure is referred to as measure 21-10 in Healthy People 2010 documentation

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children ages 2-17 with untreated dental caries.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Table

Data table will not be presented this year.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Denominator

Children ages 2-4, 6-11, and 12-17 years.

Numerator

Subset of the denominator with a clinical diagnosis of dental decay in at least one tooth that has not been restored.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children for whom a health provider ever gave advice about how smoking in the house can be bad for a child.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_7.1 Children for whom a health provider ever gave advice about how smoking in the house can be bad for a child, United States, 2005.

6_3_7.2 Children for whom a health provider ever gave advice about how smoking in the house can be bad for a child, United States, 2002.

6_3_7.3 Children for whom a health provider ever gave advice about how smoking in the house can be bad for a child, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children under age 18 for “Ever given advice” estimates, excluding nonrespondents to the question of whether a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about how smoking in the house can be harmful. “Don't know” responses to the question of when the advice was given were further excluded for “Within the past year” and “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Numerator

For “Ever given advice” estimates, children under age 18 for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about how smoking in the house can be harmful. Children for whom advice was given within the past year for “Within the past year” estimates. Children for whom advice was given within the past year or 2 years for “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children 0-40 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using child safety seats when riding in a car.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_8.1 Children 0-40 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using child safety seats when riding in the car, United States, 2005.

6_3_8.2 Children 0-40 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using child safety seats when riding in the car, United States, 2002.

6_3_8.3 Children 0-40 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using child safety seats when riding in the car, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children under 40 lb or ages 0-17, excluding missing data.

Numerator

Children in the denominator for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about using child car safety seats.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children 41-80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using booster seats when riding in a car.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_9.1 Children 41-80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using booster seats when riding in the car, United States, 2005.

6_3_9.2 Children 41-80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using booster seats when riding in the car, United States, 2002.

6_3_9.3 Children 41-80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using booster seats when riding in the car, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children 40-80 lb or ages 5-9, excluding missing data.

Numerator

Children in the denominator for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about using booster seats.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children over 80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using lap or shoulder belts when riding in a car.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_10.1 Children over 80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using lap or shoulder belts when riding in a car, United States, 2005.

6_3_10.2 Children over 80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using lap or shoulder belts when riding in a car, United States, 2002.

6_3_10.3 Children over 80 lb for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using lap or shoulder belts when riding in a car, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children over 80 lb or ages 10-17, excluding missing data.

Numerator

Children in the denominator for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about using lap and shoulder belts.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle.

Measure Source

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends (CFACT), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Tables

6_3_11.1 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle, United States, 2005.

6_3_11.2 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle, United States, 2002.

6_3_11.3 Children ages 2-17 for whom a health provider ever gave advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle, United States, 2005, by:

  • Race.
  • Ethnicity.
  • Family income.

Data Source

AHRQ, CFACT, MEPS.

Denominator

Children under age 18 for “Ever given advice” estimates, excluding nonrespondents to the question of whether a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle. “Don't know” responses to the question of when the advice was given were further excluded for “Within the past year” and “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

Numerator

For “Ever given advice” estimates, children ages 2-17 for whom a doctor or other health provider had ever given advice about using a helmet when riding a bicycle or motorcycle. Children who were given the advice within the past year for “Within the past year” estimates. Children who were given the advice within the past year or 2 years for “Within the past 2 years” estimates.

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Other Childhood Preventive Care

Measure Title

People ages 2-19 who were overweight who were told by a health provider they were overweight.

Measure Source

Healthy People 2010.

Tables

6_3_12.1 Overweight children and teens ages 2-19 who were told by a doctor or health professional that they were overweight, United States, 1999-2002 and 2003-2006.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Denominator

People ages 2-19 with a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to the 95th percentile on the BMI-for-age, sex-specific 2000 CDC growth charts for the United States.

Numerator

Subset of the denominator who reported they were told by a doctor or health professional that they were overweight.

Comments

This measure is not a Healthy People 2010 measure; Healthy People 2010 objective 19-3c is based on NHANES exam results and has a different numerator and denominator.

Return to Measure Specifications

Current as of September 2009
Internet Citation: Effectiveness of Care: Maternal and Child Health: 2008 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports. September 2009. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/nhqrdr08/measurespec/maternal_and_child_health.html