Section 1: Publishing Style (continued)

AHRQ Publishing and Communications Guideline

Type Specifications for Print or Web Manuscripts

Contractors are asked to submit material to AHRQ for publication as a final manuscript. Type specifications provided here are for word-processed documents only. Information on preparation of documents for the Web is available in Section 2 of these guidelines. Please follow this document's guidelines for how manuscript submissions should be formatted. In addition to the examples provided, AHRQ can provide sample publications for contractors or grantees to use as references.

Please note: These specifications are for final contract reports and other generic reports. Use these specifications as guidance only. These specifications do not apply to brochures, booklets, and other desktop published products. Samples provided are for word-processed documents only.

Front Matter

Title page:

  • Series title is 18-point bold Arial, title caps.
  • Main title is 20-point bold Arial, title caps.
  • Remainder is 12-point Times New Roman.

Preface heading is 16-point Arial, flush left.

Contents heading is 16-point Arial, flush left. Use dot leaders before page numbers.

The contents lists chapter titles plus two levels of headings. Include a list of all figures, tables, and appendixes at the end of the contents.

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Report Body

Text is 12-point Times New Roman.

Footnotes are 10-point Times Roman, flush left with a block indent. Use superscript numerals (1,2) for ordered references.

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Headings

The logical order of your document is made clear by the headings, which provide essential signposts to your readers. Take care to develop a plan for the headings and maintain it throughout the document.

Groups of related headings should be parallel in grammatical construction. Headings should be short and clear. In general, do not use full sentences or questions as headings.

  • Be sparing with headings, as too many levels of subordination will confuse the reader. A series of four levels of headings is provided below, in descending order of prominence. Use judgment in choosing the headings. For example, if the deepest level of subordination in your document consists of short paragraphs that really require run-in headings, but you need only two levels of subordination, you may want to choose Levels 1 and 3.

Please use the styles below for your report headings:

  • Chapter headings are 18-point Arial, bold, flush left, initial caps. All printed chapters begin on a right (odd) page and all Web-only chapters begin immediately after the previous chapter.
  • Level-1 headings are 16-point Arial, bold, centered, initial caps.
  • Level-2 headings are 14-point Arial, bold, flush left, initial caps.
  • Level-3 headings are 12-point Times Roman, bold, run-in with a period, paragraph indent of .25, first word capitalized.
  • Level-4 headings are 12-point Times Roman, italic, run-in with a period, paragraph indent of .25, first word capitalized.

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Tables and Figures

Text figures and text tables can be placed either in the chapter near their call-outs or at the end of each chapter. If they are placed at the end of the chapter, provide the table or figure number in the title.

Headings for tables and figures are 10-point Arial, bold, flush left, first word capitalized. They are numbered sequentially throughout the document with a period after the number.

Continued headings use the word "continued" in parentheses (continued) at the end of the heading.

Text for tables and figures is no smaller than 10-point Arial, except for unusually large tables, where 9 point may be warranted.

Table footnotes are 9-point Times Roman, flush left. Use superscript symbols (*,#) or superscript lower­case alpha (a,b) for ordered references.

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Back Matter

References and bibliography headings are 18-point Arial, bold, flush left, initial (title) caps.

References are 10-point Times Roman, 2 columns, and bibliographies are 12-point Times Roman and single column.

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Type Specifications for Desktop-Published Products

Periodically contractors are asked to submit materials to AHRQ for publication as final, typeset (desktop published) products. Please ask for samples of AHRQ products (i.e., fact sheets, brochures, DVDs, booklets) to gain a clear understanding of design concepts used at AHRQ.

Font sizes and graphics must be appropriate for the audience and culture. Many programs have an established "family of products" design that use colors and design elements that tie them together with a common theme. Please ask if your product is part of a larger program. See Section 7 for more information about design specifications.

If stock photographs are used, they must be purchased for AHRQ use and must be royalty-free.

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Samples for Print or Web Documents

Sample Headings

Note: These sample headings are for word-processed documents only. Examples follow each entry.

Chapter headings are 18-point Arial, bold, flush left, initial title caps.

Introduction

Level-1 headings are 16-point Arial, bold, centered, initial title caps.

Workshop

Level-2 headings are 14-point Arial, bold, flush left, initial caps.

Workshop Scope

Level-3 headings are 12-point Times Roman, bold, run-in with a period, paragraph indent of .25, first word capitalized.

A new system. The workshop chair, all six session chairs, and the two keynote speakers articulated the characteristics of the ideal health care delivery system of the future in their vision statements, without drawing the details of the structure. The new system is not merely an extension of the existing system but is fundamentally different.

Level-4 headings are 12-point Times Roman, italic, run-in with a period, paragraph indent of .25, first word capitalized.

A patient-centered system. At the center of the system is the patient and their family. Care is personalized for them, with consistency throughout the lifespan, and memory of their preferences and particularities.

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Sample: Inside front cover for a final report



This page is usually blank in printed documents.



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Sample: Title page for a final report



[Series Title: Arial Bold 18 with 1½-point line]

Final Contract Report


[Title: Arial Bold 20]

Industrial and Systems Engineering and Health Care: Critical Areas of Research

[Times New Roman 12 Point]

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
540 Gaither Road
Rockville, MD 20850
www.ahrq.gov

Contract No. 290-2007-10055

Prepared by:
Patrick Romano, M.D., M.P.H.
University of California, Davis

Peter Hussy, Ph.D.
RAND Corporation

Dominique Ritley, M.P.H.
University of California, Davis

AHRQ Publication No. No. 09(10)-0073
May 2010

 

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Sample: Back of title page

Note: Please consult with the OCKT managing editor about the specific content of this page.



[For grantee articles, final reports, and contract deliverables that AHRQ publishes:]

The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the author(s), who are responsible for its content, and do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Disclaimer of Conflict of Interest

None of the investigators has any affiliations or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

Funding Statement

This project was funded under contract/grant number XXXX from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The opinions expressed in this document are those of the authors and do not reflect the official position of AHRQ or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Public Domain Notice

This document is in the public domain and may be used and reprinted without special permission. Citation of the source is appreciated.

[Or,]

This document is in the public domain and may be used and reprinted without permission except those copyrighted materials that are clearly noted in the document. Further reproduction of those copyrighted materials is prohibited without the specific permission of copyright holders.

Statement on Accessibility

Persons using assistive technology may not be able to fully access information in this report. For assistance contact AHRQ at info@ahrq.gov [or other appropriate contact designated by the managing editor].

Suggested Citation

Suggested citation: Romano P, Hussy P, Ritley D. Selecting Industrial and Systems Engineering and Health Care: Critical Areas of Research. Prepared under Contract No. 290-2009-10027. AHRQ Publication No. 10-0079. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; May 2010.

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Sample: Acknowledgments (optional)

Note: Keep acknowledgments to one page or move them to an appendix.



Acknowledgments

We thank John Doe, Ph.D., Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the XXX School of Public Health, and Jane Roe, M.D., M.Sc., Associate Professor of Medicine at the XXX School of Medicine, for their valuable advice on this document.

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Sample: Contents



Contents

Executive Summary ..............................................................................................................
Introduction ..........................................................................................................................
   Risk Factors ....................................................................................................................
   Key Questions.................................................................................................................
   Uses of This Report.........................................................................................................
Methods ................................................................................................................................
     Literature Review Methods.............................................................................................
     Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria................................................................................
   Literature Search and Retrieval Process....................................................................
   Literature Synthesis.........................................................................................................
     Development of Evidence Tables and Data Abstraction Process.............................
     Quality Rating of Individual Studies........................................................................
     Strength of Available Evidence.................................................................................
Results ..................................................................................................................................
Discussion .............................................................................................................................
References and Included Studies .........................................................................................
List of Acronyms/Abbreviations ..........................................................................................

Figures
Figure 1. Figure name............................................................................................................

Tables
Table 1. Table name...............................................................................................................

Appendixes
Appendix A. Exact Search Strings........................................................................................
Appendix B. Sample Data Abstraction Forms......................................................................
Appendix C. Evidence Tables...............................................................................................
Appendix D. Excluded Studies.............................................................................................
Appendix E. Peer Reviewers.................................................................................................

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Submission of Documents to AHRQ

General Procedures

  1. Adhere strictly to the font types, sizes, margins, spacing, and other guidance in these Publishing and Communications Guidelines. Consult with the AHRQ managing editor regarding any special formatting requirements.
  2. Use "Styles" in Microsoft® Word® to designate the font type and size for titles, heading, and subheadings. Doing so facilitates conversion to a 508-compliant document.
  3. Remove any contractor graphics and logos.
  4. Submit the entire report electronically, either in a single Microsoft Word, Excel®, or PowerPoint® file or a series of files; as an attachment to an email or in a memory card or CD. PDF files are not acceptable as primary submissions but a PDF of the entire series of files may accompany the submission.
  5. Include the title page, citation, preface, and acknowledgments in one document called "front matter." OCKT will add minimal front matter information to reports, including the Agency logo, AHRQ publication number, and the publication date.
  6. Name the remaining files separately, indicating clearly what they are (i.e., structured abstract, table of contents, executive summary, chapter name and number, table number, appendix number, or references). Add the date of submission to each file name for purposes of version control.
  7. Paginate the report consecutively, according to the table of contents, with the exception of an executive summary and any appendixes, which should be numbered independent of the report.
  8. At the very end of the editorial process, "delink" all databases (such as EndNote®) from the final electronic files. Ensure that any data that would be pulled from a database is included in the final submission. EndNote can generate a final standalone reference list. Consult with the AHRQ managing editor about the appropriate timing of "delinking."
  9. The reference list should be numbered sequentially, and no reference should be listed more than once. Note: If inserting endnotes using the MS Word endnote function, use the cross reference function to cite the same reference more than once.
  10. Check your report for copyrighted materials. Include with your final submission a copy of permissions you received to use copyrighted material. Be sure that all copyrighted material includes attribution to source (go to Appendix 1-A).

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Procedure for Reports Submitted as Final Copy

Submit the entire report in hard copy, in a form that can be used for printing, with spacing, pagination, and margins. Submit electronic files as described above. Do not bind the final report.

Submitting Figures, Charts, Graphs, and Tables

Figures, charts, graphs, and tables should be placed in the text of the manuscript and should be numbered sequentially in the text (Figure 1, Table 1, etc.).

Figures, charts, and graphs must be provided in an editable format as well as the image pasted into the Word document. The figures, charts, and graphs should be created in Adobe Illustrator and saved as either Illustrator or eps files. Minimum resolution is 300 dpi. Tables should be created in Word. Microsoft Visio, PowerPoint, and PDF are not acceptable formats for figures, charts, and graphs.

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Procedure for Reports Submitted as Final Manuscript or Peer Review Copy

If binding the deliverable in a certain format is essential to the usefulness of the product, submit one bound hardcopy sample for AHRQ to use in developing formatted products.

Note: Grant Final Progress Reports must be submitted in accordance with instructions in Appendix 1-C.

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Procedures for Print-Ready Products Submitted for Offset Printing

  1. If submitting print-ready files, save them in their native page layout formats (i.e., Quark Xpress or Adobe InDesign). Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files are not considered print-ready formats and cannot be used for offset printing.
  2. Submit graphic and font files on a CD, along with a printout. If accompanying graphic files (eps or tif) include text, convert the text to outlines prior to saving the files.
  3. Send a color printout of the document at actual size, including folioed pages, as well as documentation indicating the versions of software used, computer platform (Mac or PC), ink colors (Pantone or CMYK), number of pages, contact person, and other relevant information. GPO Form 952 provides an easy way to convey this information. It is available for download at http://www.gpo.gov/pdfs/customers/sfas/952.pdf (Plugin Software Help).

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Procedures for DVD or CD Products

If the contract stipulates that your final product will be a DVD or a CD, you must consult with your managing editor to determine the file format for any multimedia product you submit. If your final product will be a DVD or a CD, you must provide system requirements and directions for accessing the product. An example follows:

System Requirements

This DVD can be played in stand-alone DVD players and on Mac® and personal computers with DVD drives. The minimum hardware and software requirements for viewing the DVD on a PC or a Mac® are:

Processor: 667 MHz Intel® Pentium® III processor or equivalent
Memory: 128 MB RAM
Screen Resolution: 800 x 600
Color: 16-bit
Sound card: 16-bit sound card and speakers
Peripherals: DVD drive

Directions for Use

The DVD is designed to start automatically when it is inserted into any stand-alone DVD player or computer with a DVD drive. If it doesn't:

For DVD Player: Press the Play button for the video to begin.

For Windows® PC: Open Internet Explorer, select your DVD drive, and double click Play.

For Mac®: Double click on the icon to open the disk in the Finder and then double click on the file.

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The Editorial and Production Processes at AHRQ

This section provides an overview of the different types of editorial review a document goes through once it is received by the AHRQ managing editor. It informs you about the three levels of editing most commonly undertaken, and shows you the checklists used by the editor.

Objectives of the Editorial Process

The objectives of the editorial process at AHRQ are to:

  1. Ensure that the manuscript is grammatically correct and in Government Printing Office (GPO) style.
  2. Improve its consistency, clarity, and general readability.
  3. Ensure that it conforms with AHRQ format and branding requirements.

Regardless of level of edit or degree of difficulty, each editing assignment includes a general read-through of the manuscript, editing according to the requirements of the specific level of edit, monitoring of production aspects, proofreading, and a final review of the camera-ready document.

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Levels of Edit

The publishing team in AHRQ's Office of Communications and Knowledge Transfer (OCKT) has established an editorial policy that defines three "levels of edit." Each print or electronic document received by the publishing team is assigned a level of edit according to its category and series within each category. Each level of edit indicates the degree of scrutiny and resource allocation that the document will receive.

Each level of edit includes a specified set of editorial tasks. A production schedule is established for each document, according to the level of effort desired and the time and labor resources available. This production schedule may be influenced by external factors such as a pre-specified AHRQ release date or a journal publication date.

The three levels of edit are described below:

  1. Production editing: Minimal review for completeness, obvious errors in format, conformance with branding, and compliance with Government Printing Office style and AHRQ Publishing and Communications Style Guidelines (as appropriate). Production editing encompasses proofreading of page proofs and preparation of documents prior to final approval for printing.
  2. Copyediting: This level encompasses all elements of production editing, plus attention to sentence and paragraph structure, parallel construction, conciseness, clarity, and consistency in terminology. Cross-references in the text are checked as well as the completeness, accuracy, and format of tables, charts, footnotes, and reference citations and lists. AHRQ's copyediting level also includes one major substantive element: review of documents for policy implications and political sensitivities.
  3. Substantive editing: This level encompasses all elements of production editing and copyediting, as well as direct efforts to improve the clarity, consistency, and readability of the work. Substantive editing may entail reorganizing and redrafting text, drafting transitions between sections, writing abstracts and summaries, recasting or developing tables and figures, and reviewing source documents to determine that they have been used and cited correctly.

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Checklist of Standard Editorial Procedures

The following procedures are followed for all documents regardless of level of edit. The editor will check them off as they are completed:

  • ___ Call out first references to tables or figures in the margin (T1 for Table 1, F3 for Figure 3).
  • ___ Number queries consecutively in the margin (Q1, Q2, Q3).
  • ___ Create a separate query sheet, listing each query by number and detailing the concern. This separate document will facilitate communication with the author and AHRQ program staff by providing a quick overview of the major issues to be addressed.
  • ___ In addition, embed all changes by using the "track changes" function and post all queries using the "comment" function.
  • ___ Review the document for copyright permissions and credit lines.

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Production Editing Checklist

Production editing is the least intensive of the three levels of edit undertaken at AHRQ. It entails both proofreading and elements of copyediting. The document is reviewed for completeness and for conformance with the format of the particular series to which it belongs and with GPO and AHRQ style. Obvious errors are identified and corrected. Tables and figures are reviewed and reference citations are checked for completeness and correctness of format. The need for copyright permissions is identified and permission or credit lines are created accordingly.

At this level, the editor focuses primarily on the mechanical basics rather than context or content. The production edit is used when only minimal editing is feasible, or as the final editorial review of an edited manuscript already in the production process.

Proofreading page proofs or final copy prior to approval for printing is a separate process to ensure that no elements of the text have been dropped as the document has moved through production. It is a final review for format, layout, and branding, and to ensure that no typographical errors have crept into or have been carried through the document during the process.

The production editor will check off each of the following tasks as they are completed:

  • ___ Determine that component parts are present and in correct order.
  • ___ Check for compliance with branding requirements and AHRQ identity and formatting.
  • ___ Review title page and correct for compliance with AHRQ requirements.
  • ___ Review title for appropriateness and length (10-word maximum).
  • ___ Ensure that pages, tables, and figures are numbered in sequence.
  • ___ Cross check contents page with text.
  • ___ Check consistency and subordination of headings according to AHRQ guidelines.
  • ___ Check factual information that can be readily verified (such as addresses, phone numbers, historical dates, AHRQ legislation numbers, publication number, grant or contract number, etc.).
  • ___ Ensure that all figures, tables, graphics, and other elements have copyright attribution and permission where appropriate.
  • ___ Review and correct for GPO style.
  • ___ Correct typographical errors.
  • ___ Correct spelling errors.
  • ___ Correct punctuation errors.
  • ___ Correct capitalization errors.
  • ___ Correct abbreviations and acronyms; spell out at first mention.
  • ___ Ensure that symbols are used properly.
  • ___ Correct use of numerals and units of measurement.
  • ___ Correct race and ethnicity designations, per AHRQ style.
  • ___ Ensure internal consistency in alphabetical or numeric sequences in lists, text, footnotes, tables, and figures.
  • ___ Check cross references in text to tables and figures.
  • ___ Check that data discussed in text match the same data presented in tables and figures.
  • ___ Check tables and figures for unified approach and format; query inconsistencies.
  • ___ Check reference citations for completeness and format; check that all references cited are listed and that all listed are cited; check agreement of embedded references and reference list, in terms of author name spelling and year; query inconsistencies or indicate the need for verification if errors or omissions are found.

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Copyediting Checklist

Copyediting includes all features of a production edit, plus attention to sentence and paragraph structure, parallel construction, conciseness, clarity, and consistency in terminology. The AHRQ copyeditor will check cross references in text and the completeness, accuracy, and format of tables, charts, footnotes, reference citations, and lists. The copyeditor will also review for policy implications and political sensitivities. At this level, the editor reviews the mechanical basics but also focuses on the readability and sense of the document and provides thorough verification of data presented with careful review of reference citations. This is an appropriate level of editorial review for most types of documents to ensure an accessible, good-quality publication. The copyeditor will check off the following tasks as they are completed:

  • ___ Determine that component parts are present and in correct order.
  • ___ Check for compliance with branding requirements and AHRQ identity and formatting.
  • ___ Review title page and correct for compliance with AHRQ requirements.
  • ___ Review title for appropriateness and length (10-word maximum).
  • ___ Ensure that pages, tables, and figures are numbered in sequence.
  • ___ Cross check contents page with text.
  • ___ Check consistency of headings and subordination (AHRQ guidelines).
  • ___ Check factual information that can be readily verified (such as addresses, phone numbers, historical dates, AHRQ legislation numbers, publication number, grant or contract number, etc.).
  • ___ Ensure that subordinate heads follow logically.
  • ___ Ensure that there are at least two entries for each level of subordination.
  • ___ Add or delete subheads as needed to reflect content.
  • ___ Reword or shorten headings to reflect content (3-5 words).
  • ___ Ensure that all figures, tables, graphics, and other elements have copyright attribution and permission where appropriate.
  • ___ Correct typographical errors.
  • ___ Ensure that all sentences are complete.
  • ___ Ensure that any incomprehensible statements are queried.
  • ___ Shorten and clarify excessively long sentences.
  • ___ Ensure that elements in a series are parallel.
  • ___ Review and correct for GPO style.
  • ___ Correct spelling errors.
  • ___ Correct punctuation errors.
  • ___ Correct capitalization errors.
  • ___ Correct abbreviations and acronyms; spell out at first mention.
  • ___ Ensure that symbols are used properly.
  • ___ Correct use of numerals and units of measurement.
  • ___ Correct race and ethnicity designations, per AHRQ style.
  • ___ Ensure internal consistency in alphabetical or numeric sequences in lists, text, footnotes, tables, and figures.
  • ___ Check cross references in text to tables and figures.
  • ___ Ensure that all tables and figures are specifically referenced in the correct order.
  • ___ Verify data in text against tables and figures.
  • ___ Check tables and figures for unified approach and format; query inconsistencies.
  • ___ Ensure consistent use of headings and footnotes for tables.
  • ___ Check for legends and x- and y-axis labels on charts and graphs.
  • ___ Ensure that line art (figures, illustrations, etc.) is titled and clearly labeled.
  • ___ Check reference citations for completeness and format; query inconsistencies or missing information.
  • ___ Cross check reference citations in text against reference list for accuracy.
  • ___ Reformat reference list and bibliography entries according to prescribed style.
  • ___ Eliminate or rework derogatory, judgmental, or otherwise inappropriate comments.

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Substantive Editing Procedures

Substantive editing includes all features of a production edit and copyedit, plus review for meaningful content to ensure that presentation is logical and coherent. This level of editing may involve reorganizing and redrafting text, writing transitions between sections, preparing abstracts and summaries, recasting or developing tables or figures, and reviewing source documents listed as references to ensure that they have been used and cited correctly.

This is the most complete and thorough type of editorial review. The editor evaluates and reworks the document to ensure coherent organization and understandable presentation. This level is reserved for documents that are intended to be high visibility publications that must meet the highest standards for professionalism and effective communication. It is especially important that the author and AHRQ program staff authorize all substantive changes.

The copyediting checklist is used in addition to any substantive rewriting and reorganization of the material.

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The Publications Process

This information provides an overview of the steps involved in the publishing process.

StepTitleDescription
1Program planning and consultationIndividual programs determine a need for a publication based on specific program requirements and AHRQ goals. Center/Office directors request OCKT publications planning and consultation services.

A managing editor who will handle all aspects of the publishing and production process is assigned to the project. The managing editor meets with marketing and implementation and program staff to discuss the distribution plan, dissemination needs, format, presentation, clearance issues, and parameters of document (sections, length, need for appendices, data requirements, unusual style or content needs, or requests to specific staff or contract writers to prepare product). If OCKT staff or contractor will be drafting the document, timeframes for deliverables are negotiated, including Web requirements.
2Manuscript preparation,
DHHS concept clearance

(Note: Steps 2a-2c do not apply if the document is a contract deliverable)
Departmental concept clearance documentation is prepared, including cost estimate, mailing costs, etc. Sensitive clearances are discussed with program officials and strategic planner. Meetings with strategic planner, marketing and implementation, and other program staff are held to discuss potential press or other related issues, including release events.
2aManuscript written/ substantive editDraft of product is written by the programs or materials are provided for use by contractor or OCKT staff writers in developing a draft.
2bProgram reviewProgram revises document internally. Programs may circulate document to the AHRQ director or peer reviewers within or outside of Agency for comment. Documents prepared by OCKT managing editor or outside contractors are submitted for program review. OCKT and program negotiate production schedule. Files are submitted in paper and electronically.
2cRevisions incorporated, draft made finalProgram/or OCKT managing editor reviews and incorporates comments of outside reviewers, as appropriate, and the document is revised to create final draft. If managing editor is working with an outside contractor, the editor provides feedback for revisions and ensures the contractor will submit deliverable product according to agreed-upon specifications, etc.
3Copyedit, queries resolvedManaging editor copyedits the document and resolves queries.
4Program/author reviews and approves edited manuscriptProgram staff and managing editor meet to review editorial comments or author reviews and responds independently. Changes can be incorporated on electronic file either by author or by editorial staff. Corrected manuscript is proofread against editorial/review changes to ensure accuracy. Final manuscript is circulated to any AHRQ or outside reviewers, as required. Any changes are incorporated. Program reviews and approves manuscript.
5Desktop publishingDocument is sent electronically to desktop publishing for composition according to series layout and design. Document layout is proofread and examined for introduction of new errors and for format. All changes are marked and returned to desktop publishing for corrections.
6Final review, courtesy copy providedManaging editor reviews final changes and provides courtesy copy to program staff, strategic planner, and Deputy Director of Operations (Publishing) for review.
7Printing preparationManaging editor requests that desktop publishing staff submit final materials for printing through GPO. Desktop publishing staff prepares necessary printing forms that include job specifications (as agreed in step 2, above), such as paper stock, ink color, binding, quantity, distribution plan, and mailing instructions. Associate director, publishing and electronic dissemination, approves and signs the printing requisition. Mailing list labels are generated. Paperwork for NTIS is prepared, if needed.

Managing editor folios (numbers printable pages and blanks) job for Word documents.
8Web preparationManaging editor requests txt and PDF files of the manuscript from desktop publishing and Emails them to "AHRQ WebAdmin" with context statement, directory/subdirectory placement, and any specific directions to the Web team. Web team codes the materials and provides test page for the editor to review. Material is then posted in accordance with releasing plan.
9DistributionPrinted publications are mailed/shipped according to distribution list.

Note about timelines. The amount of time required for each step in the process depends on the size of the document, the complexity, and the level of editing required. Timeframes are also subject to negotiation at the beginning of the job and may need to be renegotiated if milestone target dates are missed by either the program client or OCKT for good cause.

Explanation of levels of editing. OCKT uses three levels of editing: Level 1—Production editing: usually proofreading with light copyediting; format, design, and layout; and printing and Web production. Level 2—Copyediting: usually includes everything in Level 1 PLUS a review for grammar, punctuation, style, content agreement, accuracy, reference citations, formatting. Level 3—Substantive Editing: usually includes everything in Level 1 and Level 2 PLUS a significant amount of re-writing of the content of the document. Original writing is separate from Levels of Edit.

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Additional Information

To discuss specific issues or to obtain additional guidance on publishing style specifications, contact:

Randie Siegel
Associate Director
Office of Communications and Knowledge Transfer
Email: randie.siegel@ahrq.hhs.gov
Phone: (301) 427-1852

Sandy Cummings
Deputy Director Operations/Publishing
Office of Communications and Knowledge Transfer
Email: sandra.cummings@ahrq.hhs.gov
Phone: (301) 427-1893

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Current as of February 2013
Internet Citation: Section 1: Publishing Style (continued): AHRQ Publishing and Communications Guideline. February 2013. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/publications/pubcomguide/pcguide1a.html