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Working for Quality > About the NQS > Agency-Specific Quality Strategic Plans (continued)

National Strategy for Quality Improvement in Health Care (continued)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Agency-Specific Quality Strategic Plan

Brief Introduction/Overview

CDC's mission is collaborating to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health—through health promotion; prevention of disease, injury, and disability; and preparedness for new health threats.

CDC seeks to accomplish its mission by working with partners throughout the nation and the world to monitor health, detect and investigate health problems, conduct research to enhance prevention, develop and advocate sound public health policies, implement prevention strategies, promote healthy behaviors, foster safe and healthful environments, and provide leadership and training.

Agency-Specific Quality Strategic Plan Table

  1. Title
  2. Description
  3. Scope of Issue
  4. Rationale for Approach
  5. Metrics/Goals

NQS Aims, Priorities, and Alignment Program / Initiative
Aims

Better Care
Improve quality by making health care more person-centered, reliable, accessible, and safe.

  1. Million Hearts.
  2. Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next 5 years. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in the United States.
  3. Each year, more than 2 million Americans have a heart attack or stroke, and more than 800,000 of them die; cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the largest cause of lower life expectancy among blacks. Related medical costs and productivity losses approach $450 billion annually, and inflation-adjusted direct medical costs are projected to triple over the next two decades if present trends continue.
  4. Multifaceted initiative including public campaign and multiple programmatic and policy actions in clinics and communities.
  5. Several, including HCUP, public health surveillance data, and consistent quality metrics from the health care system.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Educational campaigns to increase awareness about heart disease prevention and empower patients to take control of their heart health.
    2. Use of health IT and quality improvement initiatives to standardize and improve the delivery of care for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
    3. Community efforts to promote smoke-free air policies and reduce sodium and artificial transfat in the food supply.

Healthy People/Healthy Communities
Support proven interventions to address behavioral, social, and environmental determinants of health.

  1. Million Hearts.
  2. Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next 5 years. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in the United States.
  3. Each year, more than 2 million Americans have a heart attack or stroke, and more than 800,000 of them die; cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the largest cause of lower life expectancy among blacks. Related medical costs and productivity losses approach $450 billion annually, and inflation-adjusted direct medical costs are projected to triple over the next two decades if present trends continue.
  4. Multifaceted initiative including public campaign and multiple programmatic and policy actions in clinics and communities.
  5. Several, including HCUP, public health surveillance data, and consistent quality metrics from the health care system.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Educational campaigns to increase awareness about heart disease prevention and empower patients to take control of their heart health.
    2. Use of health IT and quality improvement initiatives to standardize and improve the delivery of care for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
    3. Community efforts to promote smoke-free air policies and reduce sodium and artificial transfat in the food supply.

Affordable Care
Reduce the cost of quality health care for individuals, families, employers, and government.

  1. National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP).
  2. NDPP is a lifestyle coach led, 16 group session behavior modification program delivered in community settings to reduce the risk of progression from prediabetes to diabetes.
  3. CDC estimates that one of every three U.S. adults had prediabetes in 2010. People with prediabetes are five to 15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people with normal blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Effective prevention of type 2 diabetes lowers risk for possible complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and other health problems.
  4. Community-based behavior modification program.
  5. Key activities:
    1. Training—CDC and collaborators train community-based lifestyle coaches and provide the 16 session curriculum for use in community settings.
    2. Program Recognition—CDC-sponsored recognition program for quality assurance of community sites that will allow CDC to provide a registry that reports program outcomes.
    3. Intervention site recruitment and technical support.
    4. Health marketing to increase awareness and referral to NDPP sites.
Priorities

Making care safer by reducing the harm caused in the delivery of care.

  1. National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).
  2. NHSN is the nation's public health surveillance system on healthcare–associated infections and related health care quality issues; it supports the goals of the HHS Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare–Associated Infections.
  3. Each year, more than 2 million people develop healthcare–associated infections, with direct medical costs as high as $30 billion.
  4. System providing data that are used for public reporting, quality measurement, and improvement.
  5. NHSN data.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Data system with analytic tools for acute care hospitals; long-term, acute care hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; rehabilitation hospitals; outpatient dialysis centers; ambulatory surgery centers; and long-term care facilities.
    2. Capacity for health care facilities to share data in a timely manner between health care facilities (e.g., a multihospital system) or with other entities (e.g., public health agencies or quality improvement organizations).
    3. In aggregate, CDC analyzes and publishes surveillance data to estimate and characterize the national burden of healthcare–associated infections. At the local level, the data analysis features of NHSN available to participating facilities range from rate tables and graphs to statistical analysis that compares the health care facility's rates with national aggregate metrics.

Ensuring that each person and family are engaged as partners in their care.

  1. Million Hearts.
  2. Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next 5 years. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in the United States.
  3. Each year, more than 2 million Americans have a heart attack or stroke, and more than 800,000 of them die; cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the largest cause of lower life expectancy among blacks. Related medical costs and productivity losses approach $450 billion annually, and inflation-adjusted direct medical costs are projected to triple over the next two decades if present trends continue.
  4. Multifaceted initiative including public campaign and multiple programmatic and policy actions in clinics and communities.
  5. Several, including HCUP, public health surveillance data, and consistent quality metrics from the health care system.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Educational campaigns to increase awareness about heart disease prevention and empower patients to take control of their heart health.
    2. Use of health IT and quality improvement initiatives to standardize and improve the delivery of care for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
    3. Community efforts to promote smoke-free air policies and reduce sodium and artificial transfat in the food supply.

Promoting effective communication and coordination of care.

  1. Million Hearts.
  2. Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next 5 years. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in the United States.
  3. Each year, more than 2 million Americans have a heart attack or stroke, and more than 800,000 of them die; cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the largest cause of lower life expectancy among blacks. Related medical costs and productivity losses approach $450 billion annually, and inflation-adjusted direct medical costs are projected to triple over the next two decades if present trends continue.
  4. Multifaceted initiative including public campaign and multiple programmatic and policy actions in clinics and communities.
  5. Several, including HCUP, public health surveillance data, and consistent quality metrics from the health care system.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Educational campaigns to increase awareness about heart disease prevention and empower patients to take control of their heart health.
    2. Use of health IT and quality improvement initiatives to standardize and improve the delivery of care for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
    3. Community efforts to promote smoke-free air policies and reduce sodium and artificial transfat in the food supply.

Promoting the most effective prevention and treatment practices for the leading causes of mortality, starting with cardiovascular disease.

  1. Million Hearts.
  2. Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over the next 5 years. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in the United States.
  3. Each year, more than 2 million Americans have a heart attack or stroke, and more than 800,000 of them die; cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the largest cause of lower life expectancy among blacks. Related medical costs and productivity losses approach $450 billion annually, and inflation-adjusted direct medical costs are projected to triple over the next two decades if present trends continue.
  4. Multifaceted initiative including public campaign and multiple programmatic and policy actions in clinics and communities.
  5. Several, including HCUP, public health surveillance data, and consistent quality metrics from the health care system.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Educational campaigns to increase awareness about heart disease prevention and empower patients to take control of their heart health.
    2. Use of health IT and quality improvement initiatives to standardize and improve the delivery of care for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
    3. Community efforts to promote smoke-free air policies and reduce sodium and artificial transfat in the food supply.

Working with communities to promote wide use of best practices to enable healthy living.

  1. Community Transformation Grants.
  2. Community Transformation Grants support community-level efforts to reduce chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. By promoting healthy lifestyles, especially among population groups experiencing the greatest burden of chronic disease, these grants will help improve health, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending.
  3. Chronic diseases account for the leading causes of death and disability in the United States and the majority of health care spending.
  4. Capacity building and community-based intervention implementation.
  5. Healthy People 2020 focus areas and achieving demonstrated progress in the following five performance measures outlined in the Affordable Care Act: 1) changes in weight, 2) changes in proper nutrition, 3) changes in physical activity, 4) changes in tobacco use prevalence, and 5) changes in emotional wellbeing and overall mental health, as well as other program-specific measures.
  6. Key activities:
    1. Approximately $103 million in prevention funding has been awarded to 61 States and communities serving approximately 120 million Americans.
    2. These awards are distributed among State and local government agencies, Tribes and Territories, and State and local nonprofit organizations within 36 States, including seven Tribes and one Territory.
    3. At least 20 percent of grant funds will be directed to rural and frontier areas.
    4. The purpose of this program is to create healthier communities by 1) building capacity to implement broad evidence- and practice-based policy, environmental, programmatic, and infrastructure changes, as appropriate, in large counties, States, and Tribes and Territories, including in rural and frontier areas and 2) supporting implementation of such interventions in five strategic areas (Strategic Directions).

Making quality care more affordable for individuals, families, employers, and governments by developing and spreading new health care delivery models.

  1. National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP).
  2. NDPP is a lifestyle coach led, 16 group session behavior modification program delivered in community settings to reduce the risk of progression from prediabetes to diabetes.
  3. CDC estimates that one of every three U.S. adults had prediabetes in 2010. People with prediabetes are five to 15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people with normal blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Effective prevention of type 2 diabetes lowers risk for possible complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and other health problems.
  4. Community-based behavior modification program.
  5. Key activities:
    1. Training—CDC and collaborators train community-based lifestyle coaches and provide the 16 session curriculum for use in community settings.
    2. Program Recognition—CDC-sponsored recognition program for quality assurance of community sites that will allow CDC to provide a registry that reports program outcomes.
    3. Intervention site recruitment and technical support.
    4. Health marketing to increase awareness and referral to NDPP sites.
Areas of Coordination or Alignment

Demonstration of coordination or alignment with other federal agencies (i.e., involvement of other agencies in program planning or execution, mechanisms for sharing best practices, steps to reduce duplication of effort).

Million Hearts.

Demonstration of coordination or alignment with the private sector or States (i.e., stakeholder meetings, public comment periods, open-door forums, workshops).

Million Hearts.

Use of measures or benchmarks for performance measures and/or monitoring that align with the NQS.

To be determined by HHS leadership.

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