New Chartbook Identifies Health Care Disparities for Hispanics

Issue 492
AHRQ's Electronic Newsletter summarizes Agency research and programmatic activities.
October 27, 2015

AHRQ Stats: Exercise Advice for Children

The percentage of children ages 2–17 in rural U.S. counties who received medical advice about exercise, sports or physically active hobbies increased from 22 percent in 2002 to nearly 32 percent in 2012. (Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2014 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report, Chartbook on Rural Health Care.)

Today's Headlines

  1. New Chartbook Identifies Health Care Disparities for Hispanics.
  2. Just Released: New Publications From AHRQ.
  3. Free Online Continuing Education/Continuing Medical Education for TeamSTEPPS® Training Available.
  4. New Health Plan Survey Results Show Good Doctor/Patient Communication.
  5. AHRQ Study: Quality Report Cards More Effective When Nursing Homes Are Required To Participate.
  6. AHRQ Study: Affordable Care Act Could Narrow Racial, Ethnic Disparities.
  7. Featured Case Study: AHRQ Tool Helps Evaluate Pregnancy Guide.
  8. AHRQ in the Professional Literature.

1. New Chartbook Identifies Health Care Disparities for Hispanics

Steep challenges remain for many Hispanics around access to and quality of health care, according to AHRQ's recently released Chartbook on Health Care for Hispanics. For example, about 33 percent of Hispanics ages 18-64 were uninsured during the second quarter of 2014 compared with about 11 percent of whites. From 2008 to 2012, 25 percent of measures of suicide prevention and mental health care worsened among Hispanics. Hispanics also received lower quality diabetes care than whites for more than half of measures. And from 2002 to 2012, among Hispanics 18 and older who visited a doctor within the previous 12 months, about 11 percent reported poor communication with their doctor versus about 7 percent of whites. These and other findings come from the last in a series of chartbooks derived from AHRQ's 2014 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report. Many findings in the Chartbook are based on priorities outlined in the Heckler Report, the landmark 1985 HHS report that documented the existence of health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities. In addition to data on access and quality, the Chartbook includes a unique section on health care among Hispanics living on the U.S.-Mexico border. The Chartbook is complemented by Health Care Innovations for Hispanic Populations, the first in a new monthly AHRQ publication that highlights efforts by health care systems, clinics and other groups to reduce disparities among racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Chartbook findings are being disseminated with help from agencies such as the HHS Office of Minority Health, which recently posted a blog on the topic. AHRQ resources for Hispanics include preventive health and patient safety materials. Call AHRQ's Publications Clearinghouse, (800) 358-9295, to order limited free copies.

2. Just Released: New Publications From AHRQ

3. Free Online Continuing Education/Continuing Medical Education for TeamSTEPPS® Training Available

Health professionals interested in learning more about the TeamSTEPPS patient safety training program are encouraged to register for free online continuing education and continuing medical education activities. TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) is an evidence-based approach to improve communication and teamwork among health care team members. TeamSTEPPS master trainers serve within their institutions to help prepare for, implement and champion the TeamSTEPPS teamwork approach. AHRQ's Web-based continuing education course offers access to subject matter experts to assist participants with questions and challenges regarding implementation of teamwork initiatives in health care. Register and enroll.

4. New Health Plan Survey Results Show Good Doctor/Patient Communication

New results from AHRQ's CAHPS® (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) Health Plan Surveys found that responses to questions about "how well doctors communicate" were among the highest scoring measures among patients enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Participants reported that their doctor respected patient comments (78 percent for adult Medicaid, 84 percent for child Medicaid, and 86 percent for CHIP), that doctors explained things clearly (73 percent for adult Medicaid, 79 percent for child Medicaid, and 80 percent for CHIP) and that doctors listened carefully (74 percent for adult Medicaid, 80 percent for child Medicaid, and 82 percent for CHIP). Results are based on information from health plans that voluntarily submit survey data to the CAHPS Database. The 2015 CAHPS Health Plan Survey Database includes more than 165,000 survey responses from patients about their experience of care for adult and child Medicaid and CHIP populations. Users can view the results via an online reporting system or request de-identified research data files.

5. AHRQ Study: Quality Report Cards More Effective When Nursing Homes Are Required To Participate

An AHRQ-funded study found that quality report cards for nursing homes are more effective for improving care when participation is required. Voluntary quality reporting systems—found in some states and professional associations—lead to missed opportunities for quality improvements, researchers concluded. In a study of 424 Massachusetts nursing homes, researchers found that about a third, when given the choice, preferred not to participate in quality reporting. Nonparticipating nursing homes had, on average, lower quality than those that voluntarily participated. Once participation became mandatory, the facilities that initially did not participate tended to improve faster than the facilities that had always done well. “Does Mandating Nursing Home Participation In Quality Reporting Make A Difference? Evidence from Massachusetts” appeared online July 15 in the journal Medical Care. Read the study abstract.

6. AHRQ Study: Affordable Care Act Could Narrow Racial, Ethnic Disparities

The Affordable Care Act could potentially improve coverage, access and health care use for all racial and ethnic groups and also narrow racial and ethnic disparities in those areas, according to an October 8 American Journal of Public Health article by AHRQ researchers. Authors used pre-Affordable Care Act data from AHRQ's Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to examine disparities among adults targeted by coverage expansions. They found targeted groups had lower rates of coverage, access to care and preventive services use, and some racial and ethnic disparities were widest within these targeted groups. Read the abstract for the study, "Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Services and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act."

7. Featured Case Study: AHRQ Tool Helps Evaluate Pregnancy Guide

The Center for Health Literacy and Promotion (CHLP), a research organization that helps adults use health information and services, used AHRQ's Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) and User’s Guide to evaluate its six-booklet series, Beginnings Pregnancy Guide. Using the AHRQ tool, the CHLP booklet series tested both highly understandable and actionable. Read the case study.

8. AHRQ in the Professional Literature

Shapiro JS, Johnson SA, Angiollilo J, et al. Health information exchange improves identification of frequent emergency department users. Health Aff 2013 Dec;32(12):2193-8. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Ottenbacher KJ, Karmarkar A, Graham JE, et al. Thirty-day hospital readmission following discharge from postacute rehabilitation in fee-for-service Medicare patients. JAMA 2014 Feb 12;311(6):604-14. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Starmer AJ, Sectish TC, Simon DW, et al. Rates of medical errors and preventable adverse events among hospitalized children following implementation of a resident handoff bundle. JAMA 2013 Dec 4;310(21):2262-70. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Merkow RP, Ju MH, Chung JW, et al. Underlying reasons associated with hospital readmission following surgery in the United States. JAMA 2015 Feb 3;313(5):483-95. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Hilligoss B, Vogus TJ. Navigating care transitions: a process model of how doctors overcome organizational barriers and create awareness. Med Care Res Rev 2015 Feb;72(1):25-48. Epub 2014 Dec 16. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Dharmar M, Kuppermann N, Romano PS, et al. Telemedicine consultations and medication errors in rural emergency departments. Pediatrics 2013 Dec;132(6):1090-7. Epub 2013 Nov 25. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Nuckols TK, Anderson L, Popescu I, et al. Opioid prescribing: a systematic review and critical appraisal of guidelines for chronic pain. Ann Intern Med 2014 Jan 7;160(1):38-47. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

Etchegaray JM, Ottosen MJ, Burress L, et al. Structuring patient and family involvement in medical error event disclosure and analysis. Health Aff 2014 Jan;33(1):46-52. Select to access the abstract on PubMed®.

 

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Page last reviewed October 2015
Page originally created October 2015
Internet Citation: New Chartbook Identifies Health Care Disparities for Hispanics. Content last reviewed October 2015. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/e-newsletter/492.html