AHRQ Statistical Brief: Hysterectomies To Treat Uterine Fibroids Fell 20 Percent From 2005 to 2013

Issue 502
AHRQ's Electronic Newsletter summarizes Agency research and programmatic activities.
January 19, 2016

AHRQ Stats: Patient-Provider Communication

Among adults with multiple chronic conditions, nearly two-thirds reported that their providers always listened carefully and showed respect for what they had to say during health care visits in 2012. Among those uninsured, however, slightly less than half reported that their providers always explained things to them in a way that was easy to understand. (Source: AHRQ Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief #483, Experiences with Health Care Providers during Non-Emergency Care among Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions, U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, 2012.)

Today's Headlines

  1. AHRQ Statistical Brief: Hysterectomies To Treat Uterine Fibroids Fell 20 Percent From 2005 to 2013.
  2. AHRQ Study: Hypertension Is Not Diagnosed or Treated Half the Time.
  3. AHRQ's "Questions Are the Answer" Offers Tools To Promote Patient Involvement.
  4. Featured Case Study: AHRQ Research Findings Support Effort To Reduce Pressure Ulcers in Virginia.
  5. AHRQ in the Professional Literature.

1. AHRQ Statistical Brief: Hysterectomies To Treat Uterine Fibroids Fell 20 Percent From 2005 to 2013

The rate of women choosing hysterectomy (surgery to remove the uterus) to treat benign uterine fibroids decreased 20 percent between 2005 and 2013, according to a new AHRQ statistical brief. While benign fibroids pose no problem for many women, others experience heavy bleeding, pain, frequent urination and increased risk of pregnancy complications. In 2005, about 211 out of 100,000 women ages 18 to 54 had a hysterectomy to treat benign fibroids; by 2013, the rate fell to 168 per 100,000 women. Hysterectomy still remains the most common treatment for uterine fibroids, but the new data show that hysterectomies performed in hospital-based ambulatory surgery settings increased more than fivefold while hysterectomies performed in hospitals decreased by half. Meanwhile the rate of uterine fibroid embolization, a treatment that blocks the blood supply to the fibroids, increased about 175 percent in both ambulatory surgery and inpatient settings. Details of these and other findings are shown in AHRQ's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Statistical Brief, "Procedures to Treat Benign Uterine Fibroids in Hospital Inpatient and Hospital-Based Ambulatory Surgery Settings, 2013."

2. AHRQ Study: Hypertension Is Not Diagnosed or Treated Half the Time

In an AHRQ-funded study, about half of patients with diabetes remained undiagnosed and untreated for hypertension even when their blood pressure rate was recorded at a high level. The retrospective study was based on the electronic health records of more than 770 adult patients at a large Midwestern group practice from 2008 to 2011. The study used two blood pressure measurement levels, 130/80 mmHg and 140/90 mmHg, to identify cases of hypertension; normal blood pressure is considered a rate of less than 120/80 mmHg. For patients meeting the 130/80 mmHg level, only 41 percent received a diagnosis for hypertension, and 37 percent received medication. Even at the higher 140/90 mmHg level, only 52 percent of patients received a diagnosis and 49 percent received medication. Future interventions should target patients with multiple comorbidities to improve hypertension and diabetes care, the study concluded. "Diagnosis and Treatment of Incident Hypertension Among Patients with Diabetes: A U.S. Multi-Disciplinary Group Practice Observational Study" and abstract appeared in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

3. AHRQ's "Questions Are the Answer" Offers Tools To Promote Patient Involvement

"Questions Are the Answer," AHRQ's ongoing public education initiative to involve patients and their families as part of their health care team, offers several consumer tools to improve communication between patients and clinicians to help make health care safer.

AHRQ's Web site features these valuable tools:

  • Videos of patients and clinicians discussing the importance of asking questions and sharing information.
  • A brochure, titled "Be More Involved in Your Health Care: Tips for Patients," that offers helpful suggestions to follow before, during and after a medical visit.
  • Notepads to help patients prioritize the top three questions they wish to ask during their medical appointment.

"Questions Are the Answer" is designed to promote safer care and better health outcomes. To request a free supply of these materials in English or Spanish, email AHRQpubs@ahrq.hhs.gov or call 1-800-358-9295.

4. Featured Case Study: AHRQ Research Findings Support Effort To Reduce Pressure Ulcers in Virginia

An AHRQ-funded study on pressure ulcer prevention and treatment helped VHQC, a Medicare Quality Innovation Network-Quality Improvement Organization, reduce pressure ulcers nearly 78 percent in Virginia among participating patients who qualified for nursing home care but preferred to stay in their homes. Read the case study.

5. AHRQ in the Professional Literature

Two-year follow-up of the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention to improve adherence to annual colorectal cancer screening in community health centers. Baker DW, Brown T, Goldman SN, et al. Cancer Causes Control 2015 Nov;26(11):1685-90. Epub 2015 Sep 4. Access the abstract on PubMed.

The relationship of individual comorbid chronic conditions to diabetes care quality. Magnan EM, Palta M, Mahoney JE, et al. BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care 2015 Jul 23;3(1):e000080. Access the abstract on PubMed.

Health promotion text messaging preferences and acceptability among the medically underserved. Albright K, Krantz MJ, Backlund Jarquin P, et al. Health Promot Pract 2015 Jul;16(4):523-32. Epub 2015 Jan 13. Access the abstract on PubMed.

Procedure-specific surgical site infection incidence varies widely within certain National Healthcare Safety Network surgery groups. Saeed MJ, Dubberke ER, Fraser VJ, et al. Am J Infect Control 2015 Jun;43(6):617-23. Epub 2015 Mar 26. Access the abstract on PubMed.

Predictors of alcohol and tobacco use prior to and during pregnancy in the US: the role of maternal stressors. Witt WP, Mandell KC, Wisk LE, et al. Arch Womens Ment Health 2015 Jun;18(3):523-37. Epub 2014 Dec 2. Access the abstract on PubMed.

Patient-reported outcomes in a large community-based pain medicine practice: evaluation for use in phenotype modeling. Juckett DA, Davis FN, Gostine M, et al. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 2015 May 28;15:41. Access the abstract on PubMed.

Blood culture in evaluation of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Iroh Tam PY, Bernstein E, Ma X, et al. Hosp Pediatr 2015 Jun;5(6):324-36. Access the abstract on PubMed.

Cost-effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus primary surgery in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Poonawalla IB, Lairson DR, Chan W, et al. Value Health 2015 Jun; 18(4):387-95. Epub 2015 Mar 12. Access the abstract on PubMed.

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Page last reviewed January 2016
Page originally created January 2016
Internet Citation: AHRQ Statistical Brief: Hysterectomies To Treat Uterine Fibroids Fell 20 Percent From 2005 to 2013. Content last reviewed January 2016. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/e-newsletter/502.html