Primary care providers who provide contraceptive counseling increase patients' contraceptive use

Research Activities, April 2012

Contraceptive counseling as part of a primary care visit boosts the likelihood of a woman using contraception during her next sexual encounter, according to a new study. Women who received contraceptive counseling from their primary care provider were more than twice as likely as women who did not receive contraceptive counseling to report use of a hormonal contraceptive when they last had sex. Women who were specifically counseled about hormonal contraception were more than four times as likely to use these methods, and women counseled about highly effective reversible methods such as intrauterine devices or hormonal implants were more than 18 times more likely to use such methods. These findings remained significant after adjustment for demographic factors, pregnancy intentions, and prior pregnancy.

The researchers recruited women aged 18 to 50, who visited one of four primary care clinics in western Pennsylvania between October 2008 and April 2010. Participants completed a 75-question survey between 7 and 30 days after their clinic visit. These data were linked to each patient's electronic medical record data on contraceptive prescriptions before and after the clinic visit. The study was funded in part by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (HS17093).

More details are in "The impact of contraceptive counseling in primary care on contraceptive use," by Jessica K. Lee, S.B., Sara M. Parisi, M.S., M.P.H., Aletha Y. Akers, M.D., M.P.H., and others in the Journal of General Internal Medicine 26(7), pp. 731-736, 2011.

Current as of April 2012
Internet Citation: Primary care providers who provide contraceptive counseling increase patients' contraceptive use: Research Activities, April 2012. April 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/research-activities/apr12/0412RA4.html