Tobacco Users in Medicaid Expansion States More Likely To Get Help To Quit

Tobacco users in states that expanded Medicaid had a one-third higher chance of quitting tobacco and a one-half greater chance of getting the medication they needed compared with tobacco users in states that didn’t expand Medicaid, according to an AHRQ-funded study. Using electronic health record data from more than 300 community health centers (CHCs) in 10 states that expanded Medicaid in January 2014 and six states that did not, researchers found patients in expansion states were 35 percent more likely to quit, had a 53 percent greater chance of having a tobacco cessation medication ordered, and had 34 percent higher odds of having six or more follow-up CHC visits compared with patients in nonexpansion states. Increased access to insurance through the Medicaid expansion likely led to higher tobacco quit rates among patients who get their care through CHCs, according to the article. Access an abstract of the article, published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

Page last reviewed July 2019
Page originally created July 2019
Internet Citation: Tobacco Users in Medicaid Expansion States More Likely To Get Help To Quit. Content last reviewed July 2019. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. https://www.ahrq.gov/news/tobacco-users.html
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