Chartbook on Health Care for Blacks

Part 3: National Quality Strategy Priority—Care Affordability

Lack of Usual Source of Care Due to Cost

People without a usual source of care who indicate a financial or insurance reason for not having a source of care, by race, 2002-2013, and by insurance, Blacks, 2013

Charts show people without a usual source of care who indicate a financial or insurance reason. Text descriptions are below the image.

Left Chart:

Race 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Total 15.6 16.3 14.8 16.0 17.0 18.0 17.6 21.1 21.2 19.9 20.2 24
White 15.9 16.3 14.7 16.3 18.1 19.0 18.1 22.2 21.8 20.0 20.5 24.5
Black 13.1 15.7 14.8 13.0 15.0 14.6 17.1 18.8 18.8 19.5 21.7 25.8
Asian 15.4 16.9 11.1 18.0 8.5 12.5 9.7 12.5 18.8 19.1 15.6 18.6

Right Chart (Insurance, Blacks, 2013):

  • Private - 13.1.
  • Public - 16.9.
  • Uninsured - 48.8.

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2012.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population without a usual source of care.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better.

  • Importance:  High-quality health care is facilitated by having a regular provider, but some Americans may not be able to afford one.
  • Overall Rate: In 2013, 24% of people without a usual source of care indicated a financial or insurance reason for not having a source of care.
  • Trends: The percentage worsened overall (15.6% to 24%) and among Blacks (13.1% to 25.8%) and Whites (15.9% to 24.5%).
  • Groups With Disparities: In 2013, the percentage of people without a usual source of care who indicated a financial or insurance reason for not having a source of care was higher among uninsured Blacks (48.8%) compared with Blacks with private insurance (13.1%).

AHRQ Health Care Innovations in Reducing Costs

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare

  • Location: Memphis, Tennessee.
  • Intervention: The Congregational Health Network, a partnership between Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare and 512 congregations in Memphis, supports the transition from hospital to home for church members. A hospital-employed navigator visits the patient to determine his or her needs and then works with a church-based volunteer liaison to arrange postdischarge services and facilitate the transition to the community.
  • Outcomes: Reduced mortality, health care costs and charges, inpatient utilization, readmission rates, and time to readmission. Increased referrals to home health and hospice care and improved satisfaction with hospital care.

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Page last reviewed March 2016
Page originally created March 2016
Internet Citation: Part 3: National Quality Strategy Priority—Care Affordability. Content last reviewed March 2016. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/chartbooks/blackhealth/part3-nqs7.html